ghetto

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ghetto

A term with its origins in eastern Europe, used to designate the part of town occupied by Jewish citizens. Now the term ghetto is used to describe any urban area suffering significant deterioration, often predominated by one or a very few ethnic or racial groups. Disputes often arise regarding whether lenders, insurers, and other service providers are engaged in illegal discrimination when they redline these neighborhoods, or whether they are assessing risks based on the quality of the infrastructure and not on any judgments regarding the inhabitants.
The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
I am interested in the forms representations of the Warsaw Ghetto took and what they were intended to mean to audiences in their own day.
'Ghettos are like furnaces that bring out the best in metals,' Agbogu said.
The Polish government announced plans in March to create a museum dedicated to the Jews who were imprisoned in the Warsaw ghetto and then tortured and murdered by German forces during their World War II-era occupation of Poland.
'Mainly where DEA officers are, there should be no ghetto and criminals, but opposite Pipeline's Super Market, where DEA office is located, one ghetto is opposite it and the DEA officers are in cohort with the ghetto boys to snatch pedestrians', passengers' cell phones, money and other valuable items at night hours', he laments.
He does a good job in describing the three ghettos he selects and in presenting several keen and enlightening insights.
Though extermination may not be the goal of American ghettos, our ghettos, argues Duneier, are designed to protect the racial purity of majority white neighborhoods and to maintain control over poor blacks.
Isle of Wight is home to "ghettos", says Sir David Hoare
Stehle wants to know if or how artists carve out spaces in the popular discourse for alternative representations of power and place in the German urban setting: "A comparative analysis of musical depictions of ghettos exposes a series of tensions: the relationship between national and translocal frames of reference; between hip-hop's provocative gender politics and sexism; and between the claim of realness and performativity" (130).
House owners replacing a roof truss in the Czech town of Terezin in November discovered Jewish objects and possessions buried in the attic beams, the Ghetto Thereseinstadt heritage project revealed recently.
(2) This situation, however, often goes unacknowledged in studies of the Nazi ghettos, the so-called Jewish districts established by the German Wehrmacht or occupation administrations in Nazi-occupied countries.
Ghettos had largely disappeared in Europe by the middle of the 19th century when the word crossed the Atlantic.