ghetto

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ghetto

A term with its origins in eastern Europe, used to designate the part of town occupied by Jewish citizens. Now the term ghetto is used to describe any urban area suffering significant deterioration, often predominated by one or a very few ethnic or racial groups. Disputes often arise regarding whether lenders, insurers, and other service providers are engaged in illegal discrimination when they redline these neighborhoods, or whether they are assessing risks based on the quality of the infrastructure and not on any judgments regarding the inhabitants.
References in periodicals archive ?
First, and most importantly, Faith and Intellect Oriented Christian Reflection Scales made it possible to focus on the negative correlation between these two measures that serves as an empirical marker of ghettoization in the United States.
8] But more recent scholarship has often continued to locate lesbianism as prior to or outside of the forces of commodification and ghettoization, if using less vehement language and under the auspices of different ideological dispensations.
At the same time, the way that the larger reading public has embraced Diaz would suggest that he has transcended the literary ghettoization sometimes experienced by ethnic writers.
Similarly, and in tandem, the notion of the "mongrel past" works to present hybridity as a historical alternative to the racial identities bequeathed by slavery, segregation, and ghettoization.
We don't want to create a new college or seminary, which can lead to intellectual ghettoization," says Terry LeBlanc (Mi'Kmaq/Acadian), national ministries director of My People International and chair of NAIITS.
If anything, they reinforce the ghettoization of conservatism, of which talk radio's echo chamber is the major symptom.
It carries a grave risk of extremism, of ghettoization of one part of the Catholic world on such a sensitive issue.
They may feel they do not belong to the larger community and withdraw from that larger community, creating the twin problems of ghettoization and silencing (a "chilled freedom of expression"), as well as adverse economic and social consequences for the target group.
Spanning the years 1928 to 1968, the Regal Theater's history provides Professor Semmes with a great historical test case about the limits of cultural ownership in a society where "urbanization and ghettoization [are] .
In doing so, she brought local, individual struggles of African Americans--against segregation, ghettoization, and capitalist exploitation--to the national stage.
Florentine ghettoization was formerly seen as a sad endnote to a glorious Renaissance community.