gentrification


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gentrification

The informal process of revitalizing an older and deteriorated neighborhood into more upscale homes owned by more affluent occupants. The first step is usually taken by young professionals seeking affordable housing in an urban setting, who immediately begin using disposable income to upgrade their properties.Their efforts attract other like-minded home buyers. Eventually the neighborhood reaches a point where the existing homeowners can afford to sell their properties and buy elsewhere, but they can't afford to pay the increasing property taxes. The process gains momentum at that point, with former apartment buildings being converted to condos, single-family residences undergoing complete renovations, and the entire neighborhood changing to middle class or upper-middle class. It is controversial, with some claiming it destroys the ethnicity and integrity of many older neighborhoods, all in the guise of ethnocentric notions of “improvement.”

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Census Bureau, found that gentrification has little impact on the constant flow and mobility of families.
"Cape Town, like most cities, is no exception to gentrification. The city has a transport-oriented development strategy.
Hispanic activists in Albuquerque's South Valley and Houston's Northside also are speaking out against gentrification efforts they say displaces poor Latinos.
The model is based on a range of factors, dubbed 'people, place, and policy factors', which each contribute to gentrification. While many of these seem logical--the most relevant 'place' factors that serve to make an area vulnerable are access to jobs, proximity to transit stations and the quality of housing stock--some are less obvious.
However, as well as these positives, gentrification comes with a price tag - the soaring house prices and rents associated with the change often lead to the displacement of lower-income families and smaller, independent businesses.
An article in the October 21, 2018 Edition of the Houston Chronicle is also illustrative of the growing concern about gentrification in Black America: "
Gentrification, as an economic and social phenomenon, is not limited to cities in the United States.
Gentrification is not unique to a single Texas city or ZIP code: Austin, Dallas and Houston have all dealt with gentrification in some shape or form.
I wanted to start with the story lines that Vida rips straight from the headlines -- namely around the issue of gentrification. This is frequently addressed through the character of Mari (engagingly played by Chelsea Rendon), who is a member of an anti-gentrification group called Los Vigilantes de Los Angeles (which seems modelled on groups such as Defend Boyle Heights).
In the first section I describe the history of localized racial projects to contextualize my case study; I then conceptualize gentrification as a racial project and scrutinize the strategies that enable exclusionary development.
"Gentrification is a problem, of course, but it often means turning hanok into cafes or bars.
Consider gentrification, wherein significant numbers of prosperous people move into and then change the character of city neighborhoods previously home to the urban poor.