lead

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Lead

Payment of a financial obligation earlier than is expected or required.

lead

A heavy metal shown to cause learning disabilities, behavioral problems, seizures, and even death in children.The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that 3 to 4 million children had elevated lead levels in their blood in 1978. The number has now been reduced to several hundred thousand, but elevated lead levels in blood is still the leading environmentally induced illness in children.

Federal law that went into effect in 1996 requires sellers and landlords of properties built before 1978 (when lead-based paint became illegal) to do the following before any contract or lease becomes final:

1. Provide a copy of the EPA booklet, “Protect Your Family from Lead in Your Home.”
2. Disclose any known information concerning lead-based paint or lead-based paint hazards.
3. Provide any records and reports on lead-based paint and/or lead-based paint hazards.
4. Include an attachment to the contract or lease (or language inserted in the lease itself) that includes a lead warning statement and confirms that the seller or landlord has complied with all notification requirements.
5. Provide home buyers a 10-day period to conduct a paint inspection or risk assessment for lead-based paint or lead-based paint hazards.

References in classic literature ?
Only in the garden of the Selfish Giant it was still winter.
So I have made a platform of a princely garden, partly by precept, partly by drawing, not a model, but some general lines of it; and in this I have spared for no cost.
Those five years were spent in a flat in a town, and during their whole interminable length I was perfectly miserable and perfectly healthy, which disposes of the ugly notion that has at times disturbed me that my happiness here is less due to the garden than to a good digestion.
THEN he took out the handkerchief of onions, and marched out of the garden.
Presently an old man with a spade over his shoulder walked through the door leading from the second garden. He looked startled when he saw Mary, and then touched his cap.
"Strange, gentlemen," he said as they hurried out into the garden, "that I should have hunted mysteries all over the earth, and now one comes and settles in my own back-yard.
But the snow came earlier than usual that year; and although the old lame horse hauled in plenty of wood from the forest outside the town, so they could have a big fire in the kitchen, most of the vegetables in the garden were gone, and the rest were covered with snow; and many of the animals were really hungry.
I suppose you all use the garden," I went on, "but I assure you I shouldn't be in your way.
Give me a rose, that I may press its thorns, and prove myself awake by the sharp touch of pain!" Evidently, he desired this prick of a trifling anguish, in order to assure himself, by that quality which he best knew to be real, that the garden, and the seven weather-beaten gables, and Hepzibah's scowl, and Phoebe's smile, were real likewise.
(The farewell warning of Crayford in the solitudes of the Frozen Deep, repeated by Clara in the garden of her English home!)
All his food was brought to him from the Gardens at Solomon's orders by the birds.
So fond of babes was this little mother that she had always room near her for one more, and often have I seen her in the Gardens, the centre of a dozen mites who gazed awestruck at her while she told them severely how little ladies and gentlemen behave.