lead

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Lead

Payment of a financial obligation earlier than is expected or required.

lead

A heavy metal shown to cause learning disabilities, behavioral problems, seizures, and even death in children.The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that 3 to 4 million children had elevated lead levels in their blood in 1978. The number has now been reduced to several hundred thousand, but elevated lead levels in blood is still the leading environmentally induced illness in children.

Federal law that went into effect in 1996 requires sellers and landlords of properties built before 1978 (when lead-based paint became illegal) to do the following before any contract or lease becomes final:

1. Provide a copy of the EPA booklet, “Protect Your Family from Lead in Your Home.”
2. Disclose any known information concerning lead-based paint or lead-based paint hazards.
3. Provide any records and reports on lead-based paint and/or lead-based paint hazards.
4. Include an attachment to the contract or lease (or language inserted in the lease itself) that includes a lead warning statement and confirms that the seller or landlord has complied with all notification requirements.
5. Provide home buyers a 10-day period to conduct a paint inspection or risk assessment for lead-based paint or lead-based paint hazards.

References in classic literature ?
The Autumn gave golden fruit to every garden, but to the Giant's garden she gave none.
It was really only a little linnet singing outside his window, but it was so long since he had heard a bird sing in his garden that it seemed to him to be the most beautiful music in the world.
I took him round the garden along the new paths I had had made, and showed him the acacia and lilac glories, and he said that it was the purest selfishness to enjoy myself when neither he nor the offspring were with me, and that the lilacs wanted thoroughly pruning.
Then I have had two long beds made in the grass on either side of the semicircle, each sown with mignonette, and one filled with Marie van Houtte, and the other with Jules Finger and the Bride; and in a warm corner under the drawing-room windows is a bed of Madame Lambard, Madame de Watteville, and Comtesse Riza du Parc; while farther down the garden, sheltered on the north and west by a group of beeches and lilacs, is another large bed, containing Rubens, Madame Joseph Schwartz, and the Hen.
Perhaps he lived in the mysterious garden and knew all about it.
Perhaps it was because she had nothing whatever to do that she thought so much of the deserted garden.
I say," he said meekly, "there are no gates to this garden, do you know.
I saw that gentleman walking in the garden when the corpse was still warm.
I suppose you all use the garden," I went on, "but I assure you I shouldn't be in your way.
One day, however, by her self-important gait, the sideways turn of her head, and the cock of her eye, as she pried into one and another nook of the garden,--croaking to herself, all the while, with inexpressible complacency,--it was made evident that this identical hen, much as mankind undervalued her, carried something about her person the worth of which was not to be estimated either in gold or precious stones.
He knew he could never be a real human again, and scarcely wanted to be one, but oh, how he longed to play as other children play, and of course there is no such lovely place to play in as the Gardens.
Then she would come out of her dream, and look round at the grandees of the Gardens with an extraordinary elation.