Fundamental Information

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Fundamental Information

Information relating to the economic state of a company or economy. In market analysis, fundamental information is related to the earnings prospects of the firm only.

Fundamental Information

The facts that affect a company's underlying value. Examples of fundamental information include debt, cash flow, supply of and demand for the company's products, and so forth. For instance, if a company does not have a sufficient supply of products, it will fail. Likewise, demand for the product must remain at a certain level in order for it to be successful. Strong fundamental information is considered essential for long-term success and stability. See also: Value investing, Fundamental analysis.
References in periodicals archive ?
An accommodation is not reasonable if it fundamentally alters the nature of the program.
It's just more evidence that we're a fundamentally different force today--that we've become something truly amazing and that we have balanced new horizons ahead of us.
Third, we must recognize and accept the challenge that each camp must decide specifically what it fundamentally believes about youth or human development.
While voicing a general critique of US colonialism, they proposed to strengthen Puerto Rican culture but avoided formulating a platform that fundamentally challenged the political economic, and social structures organizing the island-colony.
Boyle said, "are a liability and challenges by a tax authority to an enterprise's uncertain tax positions are fundamentally about whether an asset (i.
But it is a serious mistake to conclude from this that everyone is fundamentally good willed.
The AR had flirted with amateur sociology and various forms of graphic criticism: it was essential to bring the magazine back to being fundamentally about architecture and its immediately related disciplines.
To the group of insurance executives and industry lobbyists gathered before a Senate panel in mid-November, New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer presented a clear and potentially chilling message: He thinks the insurance industry is fundamentally corrupt, and he's urging the federal government to turn the industry upside down.
Secrecy and fascism are fundamentally opposed to everything we stand for.
What makes this unusual is that the product in question is fundamentally a U.

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