fundamentalist

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fundamentalist

An investor who selects securities to buy and sell on the basis of fundamental analysis. Compare technician.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
First, the book offers inconsistent working definitions of religious fundamentalism. In chapter two, Crowley suggests that fundamentalists are those individuals who commit violence against political opponents: "I can imagine no amount or quality of rational deliberation that would convince people who kill abortion doctors, tie a dying gay man to a fence, or drag an African American man behind a pickup truck to 'understand' the situations of their victims so thoroughly that they desist from such practices" (p.
To help the reader locate in the historical context, the book begins by introducing some of the key issues related to religious fundamentalism and to Christian fundamentalism in particular.
I questioned Dann's triumphant closing note at the end about these painful excursions in faith: "Only by leaving fundamentalism will they regain the integrity and joy of their faith" (p.
Throughout the meeting's many events--plenary sessions, discussion groups, workshops and independent activities--the participants explored the various aspects of fundamentalisms evident in our lives today, forces that exercise all forms of violence, discrimination and exclusion, with a disproportionate impact on women and girls.
While evangelicals thrive within the tradition of classical or historical Protestantism in the United States, when their ancestors less than a century ago invented fundamentalism, they were creating something new out of what looked like and was advertised as "the old-time religion." Most Protestants in the nineteenth century had called themselves evangelical, and guidebooks to American religion tended to equate evangelicalism and Protestantism.
These literalist and proto-pragmatist approaches to reading, represented respectively by the evangelicals and by More, resonate powerfully in our own time, and Simpson frames his history with the contemporary dichotomy of fundamentalism and liberalism.
Seat takes care to review the history of fundamentalism in America and to differentiate the current phenomenon from the one that began as a movement to preserve and/or to restore true Christian faith.
The challenge is in confronting and dismantling what I call "sexual fundamentalism." Because after all is said and done, the post-fundamentalist formation will certainly reflect sexual fundamentalism, unless that is addressed centrally.
"All of this is what I would call the new 'fundamentalism' of our age and any kind of fundamentalism, be it Biblical, atheistic or Islamic, is dangerous, because it allows no room for disagreement, for doubt, for debate, for discussion," he said in his Christmas message.
Yousseff Choueiri intimates that fundamentalism is a common denominator in Islamic historiography for revival, reform, and radical groups.
This is a solid contribution to the historical study of fundamentalism and the South.
He said: "We are seeing the resurgence of biological readings of race and racial difference, the rise and rise of religious fundamentalism."