deficiency

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Deficiency

The amount by which a project's cash flow is not adequate to meet debt service.

Deficiency

1. The amount by which cash flow falls short of debt service. For example, if a company has $300,000 in current liabilities and only $250,000 in cash flow for a given year, its deficiency is $50,000.

2. In taxation, the amount by which one's tax liability exceeds what the individual person or organization reported. For example, if the IRS disallows certain deductions that the taxpayer applied, he/she will owe more in taxes than he/she reported on the return. Deficiency is the amount this taxpayer still owes to the IRS.

deficiency

1. The amount by which an individual's or an organization's tax liability as computed by the Internal Revenue Service exceeds the tax liability reported by the taxpayer.
2. The amount by which a firm's liabilities exceed assets.

deficiency

The amount due on a mortgage loan after adding all expenses of foreclosure and accrued interest to the principal balance of the loan and then deducting the sale price or lender-bid price for the property. The balance remaining, if any, may be collected by the lender by means of taking a deficiency judgment, unless prohibited by law or contract. Deficiency judgments may be collected just like any other judgment, through seizure of other assets or garnishment. There are two circumstances when a lender may not collect any deficiency:

1. In states with consumer protection statutes that outlaw deficiencies on first mortgages on a borrower's principal residence.

2. With mortgage loans designated as nonrecourse, meaning the lender and borrower agreed in advance that the property would stand for the debt and there would be no deficiency allowed in the event of foreclosure.

References in periodicals archive ?
The diagnosis of iron deficiency or functional iron deficiency is particularly challenging in patients with acute or chronic inflammatory conditions because most of the biochemical markers for iron metabolism are affected by acute-phase reaction.
* ROC curve analysis in individuals with functional iron deficiency shows that the biochemical markers display better sensitivity and specificity in the absence of an acute-phase reaction (C-reactive protein [less than or equal to]5 mg/L).
The majority of patients with ESRD suffer from either absolute or functional iron deficiency, both of which can severely compromise the benefits of EPO therapy.
Until further research is conducted on the clinical utility of these tests, it is best to use them in combination with the K/DOQI-recommended parameters, particularly when assessing iron status in the "challenging patient" (i.e., in cases of functional iron deficiency and RE blockade).
The authors conclude that since iron indices are not sensitive for functional iron deficiency, a trial of IV iron is necessary to exclude iron deficiency anemia as a cause of a poor response to rHuEPO.
Iron therapy should be withheld if there are suspicions that the patient may have functional iron deficiency caused by infection or inflammation.
In contrast, functional iron deficiency results when not enough iron from iron stores is released for erythropoiesis, which frequently occurs during rEPO therapy.
Hemodialysis patients who are not responding to rEPO treatment and who have been diagnosed with absolute or functional iron deficiency should receive iron supplementation.
Similarly, a low Tsat value accompanied by high ferritin levels may reflect iron deficiency, but could also be an indication of a dysequilibrium between iron storage, circulation, and the erythron (often referred to as functional iron deficiency).
Functional iron deficiency (ferritin [greater than or equal to] 100 ng/ml and TSAT <20%) occurs when EPO-induced erythropoiesis consumes circulating iron faster than body stores can release it (NKF-K/DOQI 2001).
However, they recognized that some patients with TSATs greater than or equal to 20% may still have functional iron deficiency (that is, lack sufficient iron to keep up with the increased red blood cell [RBC] production associated with EPO use).

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