full disclosure


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Full disclosure

Describes exchange and government regulations providing for the release and free exchange of all information pertinent to a given security.

Full Disclosure

The act of revealing all relevant information to the public, especially to avoid the appearance of bias or fraud. The SEC requires publicly-traded companies to render full disclosure of their financial state as much as possible. See also: Transparency.

full disclosure

The disclosure of all relevant financial and operating information. For example, the SEC requires public corporations to make full disclosure when they issue securities.

full disclosure

A requirement to reveal all information relevant to a transaction. Some states have full disclosure laws requiring transmittal of property condition information to buyers.

References in periodicals archive ?
Requiring full disclosure would only enhance the tendency of election agencies to occasionally act like, well, jack-booted thugs.
Full Disclosure's coverage of government runs from transcripts of right-to-privacy cases to exposes of secret CIA experiments in the use of microwaves for mind control--impossible, incredible, but.
Full Disclosure covers UL insurance products twice a year and features both fixed and indexed policies.
He told MPs: "I favour very much the full disclosure of all documents." Mr Burnham acknowledged it may raise "painful issues".
The need for full disclosure has become even more compelling as commercial organizations provide an increasing percentage of research support.
THE EXCERPTS IN THIS REPORT are a part of the data available in the Full Disclosure software subscription series.
He told MPs: "I favour very much the full disclosure of all documents."
But if owners take the initiative and make a full disclosure of any irregularities prior to investigation they are likely to be able to settle their tax affairs by way of a negotiated financial settlement.
"We hope now that we''ll finally see full disclosure of all the facts and we''ll finally get to the truth."
In addition, the Truth in Lending Act has always required that consumers receive full disclosure before they become obligated on open-end plans.
The second kind of attorney/client privilege is one that is recognized to encourage full disclosure by the client for the furtherance of the administration of justice.
Interestingly, one VA hospital's experience suggests that full disclosure may actually reduce litigation costs.4