Body

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Body

The main part of a document or advertisement. The body provides the most detailed information compared to other parts of a document. Especially in marketing, it is intended to elicit the desired response from the reader.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Though any particular trend pertaining to the antioxidant capacity of the phenolic fractions was not obtained, it was clearly observed that both the mycelium and fruiting body fractions possessed substantial antioxidant potential.
The existence of higher metal concentrations in younger fruiting bodies can be explained by the transport of metals from the mycelium to the fruiting body during the beginning of fructification [36].
These results are in line with previous reports of cytotoxic effects of different compounds ([beta]- glucans, proteoglycans, ergosterol, and agaritine) extracted from AbM preparations from the fruiting body, on different malignant tumors, both in vitro and in animal models [14-20].
Fruiting body of the cloud ear fungus documented from Dkshinakannada region of Karnataka was gelatinous (Fig.ld), laterally attached to the dead wood.
volvacea is a type of edible mushroom that has a volva which encapsulates the immature stipe and pileus at the early stage of fruiting body development.
The green fruiting body shown in Figure 5a is most likely a species of the genus Chlorociboria, a staining fungus that does not cause significant decay.
The upper surface of cap is rough or smooth but its lower surface bears the gills (partitions) or pores, which produces microscopic spores which are of different colored and shaped, that serve as a mean of reproduction and develop mycelium on germination, which convert in to the fruiting body called mushrooms, having a form of plant life, without green coloring matter.
militaris in vitro, especially in the form of fruiting body (Das et al., 2010; Shrestha et al., 2005).
The typical 'mushroom' as we know it, is a fruiting body that grows from a mycelial mat that is hidden for most of its life within a substrate of soil, leaf litter or dead wood.
The growths can be different colours - they're often whitish grey (sometimes with patches of yellow and lilac) and when they're most dangerous, orangey ochre (this is the fruiting body), with spores resembling brick dust.