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Fraud

Any attempt to deceive another for financial gain. A clear example of fraud is selling a new issue that does not really exist. That is, the company can collect money from investors and, rather than use it to finance operations, pocket the money and do nothing. There are a number of types of fraud. Common types include forgery of documents, false claims in insurance, and filing bankruptcy to avoid debt rather than because of financial hardship.

fraud

Deception carried out for the purpose of achieving personal gain while causing injury to another party. For example, selling a new security issue while intentionally concealing important facts related to the issue is fraud.

fraud

the gaining of financial advantage by a person who deliberately deceives another person or business, by mispresenting himself.

fraud

A deceitful practice. Fraud consists of a misrepresentation of a material fact that is relied upon by another party to his or her detriment.There is no requirement that the misrepresentation be intentional.The thing misrepresented must be a fact; it is very difficult to prove fraud when one fails to fulfill his or her obligations but had good intentions in the beginning.

There are three types of fraud:

1. Intentional fraud. Punitive damages may be assessed for this type of fraud.

2. Negligent fraud. As when one makes a statement recklessly but without any intention to deceive, and someone relies on that statement and is injured when it turns out to be false. One example would be a real estate agent telling a buyer that all appliances are new when, in reality, the agent didn't know but thought they looked new. Depending on the degree of recklessness involved, this type of fraud may or may not support punitive damages.

3. Innocent fraud. As when one takes steps to confirm facts but is perhaps mistaken or given mistaken information, and then relays that information to someone else who relied on it and was injured.

The Statute of Frauds is a rule that says certain contracts must be in writing, including contracts having to do with real estate. It has nothing to do with fraud, per se, except to protect against possible fraud by requiring a writing.

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behind diversity jurisdiction, fraudulent joinder, and choice of law.
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Yet, identifying what constitutes a fraudulent transfer under the Uniform Fraudulent Transfer Act is not particularly difficult.
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The notion that the Federal budget can be balanced by an attack on fraudulent Medicaid and Medicare claims surfaced in a report issued last year by the House Committee on Government Reform and Oversight.
441-c lists the violations for which brokers and salespeople are subject to penalty including, but not limited to untrustworthiness, incompetence, misrepresentation and fraudulent practices.
The report, filed by Barry Zaretsky (a professor at the Brooklyn Law School), examines the concept of "fraudulent conveyance," which deals with the fraudulent transfer of something of value to a third-party without receiving something equitable in return.
From December 2001 to May 2005, Piscioneri embezzled credit union funds by creating fraudulent loan accounts in the names of credit union members and deposited that money into her own accounts, her husband's accounts, or other family members' accounts, according to federal prosecutors.