franchisor


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Franchisor

A company that sells the right to use its products to an individual or company. McDonald's is a prominent example of a franchisor. If one wishes to open a McDonald's franchise, everything from the food to the uniforms has already been determined by the corporation. McDonald's sells the right to use these to the franchisee. See also: Turnkey business.

franchisor

A firm that sells to others the right to sell or rent its products and to use its name. Compare franchisee.
References in periodicals archive ?
A: For one, putting up a franchise company enables the franchisor to optimize tax advantages.
As a result of the franchisor not maintaining the growth of its infrastructure, the franchisee may find that his business is falling further and further behind the competition.
Franchisors can change the franchise system at will, so that even if a franchisee does thorough due diligence this might not help them during the relationship.
The bill was introduced by state Senator Charles Schwertner, reportedly because of franchisors' concerns that recent National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) actions targeted franchisors for franchisees' labor law violations.
If the franchisee agrees to shut down all the relevant existing F and B brands that conflict with the franchisor 's brand, the franchisor also demands that the CEO of the franchisee's company must hold the citizenship of the country where the brand is to be set up to attend a fair-period of training at the franchisor 's institute.
What steps does the franchisor take to extend and update the business concept?
PTMS Solution: Franchisee profile pages and sub-domains that become buried in the national franchisor website have no positive effect on local search results.
Whether the franchisor plans to operate a competing franchise system.
The conditions under which the franchisor will grant a relocation.
Since the inception of franchisor liability, courts seem to have gradually raised the standard of proof required in order for consumer reliance to be persuasive.
A) a continuing financial obligation to the franchisor or its associate by the franchisee and significant continuing operational controls by the franchisor or its associate on the operations of the franchise business, or