Foster Child

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Foster Child

For tax purposes, a child placed with the taxpayer by an authorized placement agency or by judgement, decree, or order of any of competent jurisdiction. Such a child is referred to as an "eligible foster child."
References in periodicals archive ?
Children who are in foster care as a result of a court ruling and "judicial surrender" of parental rights; and
Child welfare systems are complicated, but the root cause of deficiencies in Oregon's foster care system is simple: Not enough capacity.
Under the agreement, Coordinated Care of Washington will manage the healthcare services and programmes for children and youth in foster care and adoption support programmes, as well as young adult alumni of the foster care system (ages 18-26 years old).
In general, abuse, neglect, and abandonment are the most frequent reasons why children enter the foster care system (Andersson, 2009; Bolen, McWey, & Schlee, 2008; Bruskas, 2008; Children's Bureau, 2014, Vanderploeg, Connell, Caron, Saunders, Katz, & Tebes, 2007; Whiting & Lee, 2003).
Several states offer foster care services past age 18, independent of the federal option and with no federal reimbursement, but eligibility criteria and program components vary considerably, since states must fund these programs themselves.
The research also shows that the more than 43,000 students in foster care constitute a distinct demographic profile - different from their classmates statewide and also different from other students designated as low SES.
Such activities have profound benefits for the young people in foster care.
Finally, health and mental health differences between foster care alumni and general population samples have been documented.
A key provision of this law was a directive to states to develop plans for health care oversight and coordination for children in foster care, calling on states to monitor the prescription of psychotropic medication.
Muravich, (2000) stresses the need for change in the foster care system in the United States.
that is the medical home for children in foster care and nearby homeless shelters.
A significantly greater proportion of African American children are in foster care than children of other races and ethnicities relative to their share of the general population.