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Header

In publishing, an area toward the top of a page where one may print a headline, a date or other relevant information. Often, though not always, the text in a header is in larger print and may be repeated on each page of a document.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Many different cultures around the world have their particular standard formats for expressing data such as dates and times-whether it's a person writing it out by hand, something appearing in print, or data stored digitally.
In Study 1 we found that a format effect occurred when there was sufficient affect stimulus.
Articulating the Television Format Phenomenon Through Inter-Asian Frameworks
If there is diversity of opinion as to the current trends in formats, so too as to what it takes to make a great format.
Participation in Formats Asia is by invitation from Formats Asia or is included as part of the CASBAA Convention delegate pass.
On DR1, the numbers of first-release format hours in the years 2000, 2009, 2010 and 2011 were forty-two, fifty-three, forty-six and twenty-nine hours, respectively, indicating a recent decline (see, Table 1 below).
Best Overall Store Design -- International/Conventional Format (new ground-up construction, under 50,000-square-feet)
"We certainly hope the format, which we believe is evolutionary, makes for more attacking cricket throughout all overs of the game in a format which offers captains some new ideas to play with," Sutherland said.
According to BBC News, the UK National Archives, which holds 900 years of written material, has more than 580 terabytes of data--equal to 580,000 encyclopedias--in older file formats that are no longer commercially available, meaning all the information is not accessible.
In either case, consumers don't have to worry about obsolescence when it comes to their old DVD collections, since both Blu-ray and HD-DVD players are compatible with current disc formats.
The Library of Congress scans cartographic materials at 300 dots per inch (dpi) with tonal resolution of 24-bit color and saves files in TIFF non-compressed file format. The British Ordnance Survey (OS) scans maps between 254 dpi and 400 dpi in a non-compressed TIFF file with 256 colors.
Thanks to the ease of the DVD format, many more foreign movies are now easily accessible for purchase worldwide, although there remains a problem with format compatibility in different regions (the seven DVD zones and the three TV formats: Pal, NTSC, Secam).