Alien

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Alien

A non-citizen. An alien is a citizen of a state other than the one in which he/she resides, works, and/or visits. Aliens usually have restrictions on working in other countries. Many countries also have restrictions on how much investment or ownership of property aliens are allowed to have. A few countries forbid foreign investment entirely, though many encourage investment by aliens as it brings capital into the countries.
References in periodicals archive ?
53) If a taxpayer makes a valid election, this "net election" (54) treats the foreign person as if he or she is engaged in a U.
7 percent of total receipts and payments), but with the third largest number of related foreign persons (639 persons or 5.
source income payments to foreign persons was subject to tax.
Finally, if a foreign person is ineligible for access to EAR-or ITAR-controlled technology, the company may apply to the appropriate U.
Second, given all of the recent press dealing with the use of derivatives by foreign persons (primarily offshore hedge funds) to convert what would otherwise be U.
Therefore, the mere fact that a foreign person owns USRPI does not trigger any negative tax consequences under IRC section 897.
Furnishing assistance (including training) to a foreign person, whether in the U.
In cases where sanctions are not imposed against foreign persons who make transfers covered by the act, the president is required to explain to Congress why sanctions were not imposed.
source income, on cash payments along with the full value of intellectual property rights transferred to a foreign person under a CLA.
TRIA provides for a federally funded backstop for insurers in the event of a "certified act of terrorism;" in particular, acts committed by one or more persons acting on behalf of a foreign person or foreign interest.
to have been committed by an individual or individuals acting on behalf of any foreign person or foreign interest, as part of an effort to coerce the civilian population of the U.
Presumably, one of the most important pieces of advice that the consular officer would provide is that the foreign person arrested or detained seek legal counsel, an advisement that most probably already would have been communicated to the individual during a Miranda warning.

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