play

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Play

Informal for an investment or investment decision, especially one that becomes profitable.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

play

1. An investment.
2. See direct play.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the study, they amassed a novel dataset of more than 500 April fool articles from over 370 websites written over 14 years.
It's also a chance for our customers to capture a cheeky fool of their own and make sure they don't wreak havoc on the big day."
"With Witlingo's Analytics, Diagnostics, and Discovery SaaS Portal, we will be able to continually learn about how customers are using the Motley Fool skill," Ahmed Bouzid, Co-Founder and CEO of Witlingo said.
Unluckily the tradition of making people fool on first day of April every year had also spreading in Pakistan in the past but with exposure of media, the people are becoming more and more aware and the graph of this ugly trend is going down in the country.
'You can fool some of the people all of the time and those are the ones you want to concentrate on.' George W Bush.
H L MENCKEN said: "A man maybe a fool and not know it, but not if he's married." The power of the Moon and Venus is the power for romance or for its opposite in your chart.
The fourth chapter argues that the two editions of King Lear offer contrasting but equally effective versions of the Fool. Counter to common arguments, Hornback argues that the Fool of the Folio is a natural fool and that the Fool of the Quarto is a bitter artificial fool.
and compound meanings and no more fool's play to multiply selves or
The fools' journey; a myth of obsession in Northern Renaissance art.
Basil's Cathedral on Red Square, the "holy fool" has been a well-known but unexplained cultural phenomenon in Russia.