floor

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Floor

The area of a stock exchange where active trading occurs. Also the price at which a stop order is activated (when the price drops low enough to activate such an order). In context of interest rates, a level which an interest rate or currency is structured not to go below. In context of OTC interest rate options, a series of interest rate put options, where the buyer of the floor guarantees a minimum interest income
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Floor

1. See: Exchange floor.

2. The lowest price or some other limit that can occur. For example, in an adjustable-rate mortgage, the lender will often specify a floor for the interest rate, which means that even though the interest rate on the mortgage changes from time to time, it will never drop below the specified floor. These exist to protect one or both parties to a contract or investment. See also: Ceiling, Collar.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

floor

The area of an organized exchange where securities are traded. Customer orders are transferred to the floor, where they are executed by members of the exchange.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

floor

Other than the obvious, refers to the bottom of something. Variable-rate mortgages may provide a minimum interest rate,called a floor,even if the rate would otherwise be less if the index dropped. Percentage leases with rent partially based on gross revenues might have a minimal amount,or floor payment.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Damage of top 5 construction trades to various parts of a body from work-related musculoskeletal symptoms (Holmstrom and Engholm 2003) Body part Trades Neck Crane operators Painters Insulators Scaffolders Machine operators Shoulder Scaffolders Insulators Painters Crane operators Machine operators Elbow Scaffolders Bricklayers Roofers Sheet metal workers Insulators Wrist or hand Scaffolders Sheet metal workers Floorers Rock workers Glaziers Upper back Insulators Scaffolders Crane operators Glaziers Roofers Hip Roofers Rock workers Asphalt workers Bricklayers Ground preparators Knee Floorers Plumbers Roofers Sheet metal workers Insulators Ankle or foot Scaffolders Roofers Sheet metal workers Rock workers Repair men Lower back Roofers Floorers Scaffolders Insulators Bricklayers Table 2.
830 managers n 610 clerical staff n 590 professionals n 180 technicians n 1,260 into`wood trades' 490 bricklayers n 370 painters and decorators n 170 plasterers n 200 roofers n 160 floorers n160 glaziers n 160 other specialist building operatives n 120 scaffolders n n 80 plant mechanics/fitters n160 plant operatives 120 steel erectors (structural)410 other civilengineeringn 350 general operatives n n 700 electricians n
Five hundred trained floorers must be recruited in the UK by 2006 to meet industry demand in Birmingham, reveal figures released recently by the Construction Industry Training Board.