flexitime


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flexitime

a method of organizing hours of work which permits some flexibility in the times of starting and finishing each working day. Usually the employee will be required to commence work within certain times (for example between 7.00 and 9.30 a.m.) and to remain at work until a specified time (for example 3.30 p.m.). Within these limits employees can choose day by day their hours of work. However, they will usually be required to work a specified total number of hours over a period of, say, one month. Any shortfalls at the end of the period may be carried forward or result in pay deductions whilst excess hours could be dealt with by additional pay or time off in lieu. Flexitime enables employees to adapt their working day to other commitments. However, it also confers advantages to employers: in so far as it requires precise timings to be kept it can tighten control of hours of work; and because potential absences from work (for example, visit to a doctor) can be pushed outside the flexi-day it can improve utilization of staff and productivity. See ANNUAL HOURS.
References in periodicals archive ?
But it is not only parents who are interested in flexitime, many people have to juggle their time, whether dealing with the admin of life in the UAE, or wanting to spend less time commuting and more time living.
Flexitime may be high tech, but dressing up retro (up to the hairstyles) is super low tech and takes ages.
Only some staff at the Herbert had been on Flexitime and while it was being scrapped the Trust was always sympathetic to any of its employees who had particular needs to adapt their hours.
Employees with short-term care responsibilities lasting three to four months can now reduce their working hours temporarily using their flexitime account by agreement with their line manager.
TUC general secretary Brendan Barber said: "The Olympics are an ideal opportunity for more employers to try out innovative flexible working practices such as flexitime and home working.
The outdoor workforce has no access to the flexitime scheme, but is offered nine-day fortnights.
UMC's Hsuan pointed out that putting flexitime into practice is technically difficult in consideration of the ingrained mistrust between the management and the labor.
In 2010, 27 per cent of employees in the Czech Republic used flexitime benefits at work, according to a survey from the website platy.
Grassle also criticises the flexitime scheme, introduced by the EU executive in 2007, which allows staff to earn additional two days off every four weeks.
City chiefs say the internal website will allow staff to access other information, such as flexitime, training and personnel forms.
There was only one study of flexitime work conditions, where employees have some say in when their daily work schedule begins and ends.