Flake

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Flake

Slang; in auto sales, a term for a non-creditworthy customer with a small or no down payment. Flake customers are very high risk for the seller, and likely will not obtain financing.
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* Kimberley dentate points, which are invasively pressure flaked biface points, where the 'teeth' formed by pressure flaking on the margins are separated by notches wider than their teeth (Akerman et al.
However, it must be noted that not all pressure flaked points from the Kimberley display the characteristics of 'Kimberley points' as they are strictly defined above.
Most authors have accepted that, to some extent, the finely crafted Kimberley points that made their way into the hands of adjacent Aboriginal groups, antiquarians and archaeologists during the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries were the product of recent (post-contact) developments, due to the relative absence in archaeological excavations of finds of finely crafted bifacially worked pressure flaked points with serrate or denticulate margins (e.g.
Most authors would agree with a general chronological schema for the Kimberley which saw the appearance of percussively flaked uniface and biface points in the mid Holocene, and the appearance of pressure flaked points, including Kimberley points, either in the early contact period (ie c.
It is best to consider these precontact Keep River points as 'pressure flaked points' in the terminology adopted in this paper, rather than 'Kimberley points' under the Akerman and Bindon (1995) definition, as most display either invasive working or serrated margins, but generally not both.
Archaeological excavations undertaken in 1998 at Wilinyjibari, located approximately 50 km to the south of the town of Halls Creek (Harrison and Frink 2000), are relevant to discussion regarding the origins of pressure flaked points in the Kimberley.
One of the problems faced by archaeologists interested in dating the appearance of pressure flaked points is the low numbers in which they often occur in excavated rockshelter deposits.
The general term jimbila was used to describe a wide variety of points including unifacial percussion flaked points as well as bifacial pressure flaked Kimberley points.
In Bryan's volume and in the February NATURAL HISTORY, Irving reports that some of the bones are broken and flaked in systematic ways, probably through the use of stone hammers and scrapers.