population

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population

  1. the total number of people resident in a country at a particular point in time. The UK, for example, had a population of 59 million people in 2004. The size of the population is determined by past and present birth and death rates, together with net migration trends – the number of people leaving the country to live abroad (emigration) compared with the number entering the country to take up residence (immigration). The UK birth rate is currently 11 births per 1000 of the population per annum and the death rate 10 per 1000 of the population per annum. In most advanced countries, both birth and death rates have declined over the long run because of rising living standards and improved medical care; this has produced slow-growing, ageing populations.

    The total size of the population and its composition in terms of proportion of males to females and age-group distributions, combined with various SOCIOECONOMIC factors influencing buying characteristics, are important to businesses in assessing the market potential for their products.

  2. all possible observations of a certain phenomenon in statistical analysis, for example incomes of all people resident in a country. Where it is too time-consuming and expensive to record all possible observations it is necessary to take a SAMPLE, for example the incomes of 1000 citizens, and generalize about the incomes of all citizens from this sample. See STATISTICAL INFERENCE.
Populationclick for a larger image
Fig. 144 Population. The UK birth and death rates, measured in numbers per 1,000 of the population, from 1740 to 2004.

population

the total number of people resident in a country. The size of the population is determined by past and present BIRTH RATES and DEATH RATES as well as MIGRATION trends. In most advanced industrial countries, both birth and death rates have declined over the long run (see DEMOGRAPHIC TRANSITION), which has produced slow-growing populations. The size and growth of a country's population determine the size of the LABOUR FORCE that is available to produce output, a country's GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT divided by its population providing a measure of the country's general prosperity (see INCOME PER HEAD). In 2004 the UK's population was 59 million (see Fig. 144 ). By comparison, the population of Germany was 82 million, the USA 288 million, Japan 127 million, India 1,048 million and China 1,281 million.
References in periodicals archive ?
In order to tackle this situation Sarndal [14], proposed the following unbiased estimator for finite population mean.
Likewise, understanding selection limit theory and the effects of genetic drift and inbreeding depression on symmetry of response to artificial selection (Chapter 4) requires a background in the effects of finite population size on the mean and variance of quantitative traits, which is not covered until Chapter 8.
ST] illustrated three important properties of changes in population means due to finite population size: (i) the width of the interval is proportional to the square root of [V.
Second, even though finite populations were simulated, the selection intensity (that is, the standardized deviation between the population mean and the mean of selected individuals) assumed was that of a large population.
Linkage tends to make the two pleiotropic systems more similar by coupling the behavior of one-trait-only and shared loci, but in finite populations it also enhances the dispersive effect of random genetic drift.
1968), however, found that larger population sizes gave more response to selection and warned that the effects of finite population size should not be ignored even in the short term.
This can be viewed as a selection-drift balance problem: when selection is weak compared to drift, the AD model is inaccurate (due to nonequilibrium and finite population size), possibly leading to false conclusions concerning the genetic basis of heterosis.
The information on auxiliary variable plays a major role for the estimation of finite population mean in the field of survey sampling and have greatly increase the efficiency of the estimators.
Hence [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (Steel and Torrie, 1980) where the quantity (2N - 2F)/(2N - 1) is the finite population correction.
ABSTRACT: In this paper generalized exponential type regression estimators under simple random sampling without replacement has been proposed for estimating the finite population mean of study variable by using two auxiliary information in single phase sampling.
However, even if mating including selfing is at random, [Alpha] is not exactly zero due to the discreteness of the possible number of genotypes in a finite population, and the appropriate value is obtained by Kimura and Crow (1963) and Robertson (1965) as [[Alpha].