filled land

filled land

An area where the grade—the level of the land—has been raised, preferably by depositing clay, soil, rock, and gravel and then compacting the fill at regular intervals as the grade is raised. Less ideal, but more common in areas with little regulatory oversight, is the practice of dumping tree stumps and other vegetation,covering them with 6 feet or so of clay,and then compacting only the top 6 feet.The property will pass most compaction studies,which bore down only 6 feet.In time, however, the vegetation will rot, the land will settle, and the owner will see potholes and foundation cracks.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Ralph's property is part of a 45-lot subdivision, Berkeley Quay, developed by Berkeley Point in 1966 and located on a peninsula of filled land in the bay.
The remaining filled land not used by the stadium along the bay would be landscaped into a park and connected to the county-owned property known as Parcel B behind the arena.
Tokyo Disneyland, which is built along the filled land of Tokyo Bay, experienced tilted buildings and telephone poles as well as broken street and parking lot pavement due to liquefaction of the ground.
Orangi Pilot Project's Perveen Rahman said, "The settlements along the nullahs would be affected by flash floods, while the goths and abadies on the peripheries of the sea in areas like Keamari, Bin Qasim Town, Mauripur, Machhar Colony and Hawkesbay would be affected by the cyclone." In case of high tide, the consequences for projects constructed on "filled land" could be dire, as the sea "would reclaim the land taken away from it," she added.
Filled land, land created from the filling of flats, is new land?
330, 331 (1876) (extending the holding to permit the littoral owner to take the filled land).
* Has not been built on contaminated or filled land.
Moreover, while not specifically holding that dredging confers title under the act, the Supreme Court in Holland recognized that the dredging of channels and turning basins were improvements that made the filled lands usable and resulted in beneficial commerce,"one of the objectives contemplated by the Legislature in the enactment of the [Act]."[28] This finding lends support to the Third District's case-by-case approach, looking to the effect of the dredging on the utility of other improvements.