Figure

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Figure

Refers to details about price including the bid and offer. See: Handle
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.
References in classic literature ?
Knightley, in walking up to Hartfield to breakfast, did not arrive at all too soon; and half an hour stolen afterwards to go over the same ground again with him, literally and figuratively, was quite necessary to reinstate her in a proper share of the happiness of the evening before.
He final- ly concluded that the only way to prove himself was to go into the blaze, and then figuratively to watch his legs to discover their merits and faults.
Of course, you will note that I am speaking figuratively rather than literally.
He was in the bustle of the city, as of old; but the crowd swept by and saw him not; he was, we may figuratively say, always beside his wife and at his hearth, yet must never feel the warmth of the one nor the affection of the other.
"Do you mean literally or figuratively? Literally, I conclude.
Anne and Priscilla and Phil had awaited her advent rather dubiously; but when Aunt Jamesina was enthroned in the rocking chair before the open fire they figuratively bowed down and worshipped her.
"I spoke figuratively. I seek to do what men have done before me - to write and to live by my writing."
(morally) started to find myself thinking that, after all, it would, perhaps, be better to spend one's days with such a woman than with Eliza Millward; and then I (figuratively) blushed for my inconstancy.
'I was speaking figuratively. I meant hustle about and work in the open air.
If Mr Quilp spoke figuratively, and meant to imply that the air breathed by Miss Sally Brass was sweetened and rarefied by that dainty creature, he had doubtless good reason for what he said.
Summary: New Delhi [India], Apr 13 (ANI): With temperature soaring- both literally and figuratively with the daily war of words between politicians, leaders had a difficult time to maintain the usual schedule during Navratra fasts.
Podhoretz was of course speaking figuratively, referring to cultural and class differences separating the two boroughs that were infinitely wider than the East River.