fees


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Fee

An agreed-upon, stated amount one pays for a service or privilege. For example, one may be required to pay a fee to attend college, to open an account with a brokerage, or to do any number of other things. Fees are stated and are usually standardized for the person or organization receiving them.

fees

the payments to professional persons such as lawyers and accountants for performing services on behalf of clients.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the statement, Nigerians will be required to pay a fee called visa 'issuance fee', or 'reciprocity fee', for all applications for nonimmigrant visas in B, F, H1B, I, L, and R visa classifications.
* The proposed fee table includes a field for total fees.
* When should fulcrum fees (1) be preferred over flat fees or other performance fee structures?
Before Palma, the district courts conflicted with respect to the "fees for fees" issue.
(O'Neill, Mellon Bank and Scott are discussed in Satchit, "Trusts, Investment Advisory Fees and the 2% Floor," TTA, February 2004, p.
Within the past two years two major developments--new legislation and a court decision--have changed the federal tax treatment of legal fees incurred in connection with personal damage awards.
In order to facilitate discussion and to share proven incentive strategies across the entire acquisition workforce, the Department has established the "Award and Incentive Fees" Community of Practice (CoP) under the leadership of the Defense Acquisition University (DAU).
Such a system would significantly reduce the chance of incurring late fees or higher interest.
South Carolina manages roughly 5 million tires per year and collects from $1.8 to $2 million each year in tire fees. "We did have two years in which the unexpected balance of the tire funds were moved to the general fund for other uses," White says.
Plan sponsors may think that they are paying little or no fees for services provided, when in fact substantial fees are being paid to service providers.
Pay-to-play fees help prevent the elimination of after-school sports and clubs.
Similarly, chapters have been encouraged to consider whether there would be any benefit in establishing an unemployed member "support group." In addition, chapters have been asked to consider waiving local meeting fees (including pre-billing assessments) for members in transition or potentially subsidizing the unemployed members' Institute-level dues or a portion of an unemployed members' registration fees at Institute-level programs.