fees


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Fee

An agreed-upon, stated amount one pays for a service or privilege. For example, one may be required to pay a fee to attend college, to open an account with a brokerage, or to do any number of other things. Fees are stated and are usually standardized for the person or organization receiving them.

fees

the payments to professional persons such as lawyers and accountants for performing services on behalf of clients.
References in periodicals archive ?
Investment advice fees are subject to the 2% floor under regulations applicable to individual taxpayers; thus, the fees are a cost that individual taxpayers are capable of incurring.
Included in it was new IRC section 62(a)(20) which provides an above-the-line deduction for legal fees and court costs incurred in connection with discrimination awards.
While award fee arrangements should be structured to motivate excellent contractor performance, award fees must be commensurate with contractor performance over a range from satisfactory to excellent performance.
50 fee on new tire sales, all of which goes into the state's general fund.
Pay-to-play fees deny students their right to a free public education.
If you're moving here with children or other family members, moreover, multiply those fees several times over.
The Court also considered the issue of whether the unlawful fax fee of $10 and the recording fee of $13.
Provide the notice required by paragraphs (b)(1) and (b)(2) of this section either by showing it on the screen of the automated teller machine or by providing it on paper, before the consumer is committed to paying a fee.
But, he adds, the April 1 increase in parking, terminal, bridge and landing fees will affect only airlines, not passengers or motorists who park at the airport.
And for that reason,, he says, charging user fees is a more equitable way to recover land-management costs than taxation.
In a pricey market, seniors are generally more reluctant to pay relatively high, $3,000-a-month plus service fees rather than committing to a one-time entry fee with a lower monthly service fee.
The Wisconsin case is only one skirmish in a long feud over the constitutionality of using public universities' student activity fees to fund political groups.