Fascism

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Fascism

A political system characterized by extreme nationalism. When it emerged in the early 20th century, it rejected both left-wing and right-wing thought and advocated a system in which the citizens of a nation work together for a common goal (usually under the command of a strong leader). Fascism is noted for corporatist economic policies, in which interests of the state, businesses and workers cooperate to set policies. It is strongly associated with racism and/or expansionism.
References in periodicals archive ?
That quibble aside, Paul Gottfried's is far and away the best book on fascism I've read in many years.
A similar double standard allows Eatwell to portray Tyndall's anti-immigrationism as central to his fascism while denying that La Rocque (who also played the anti-immigration card) was fascist.
5) Intense public interest in their debates resulted in a virtual media industry devoted to French fascism in which abstruse historical points of contention were fought out in the popular press.
Sternhell has established a compelling case for a variant of fascism native to France - indeed, a fascism more virulent and "purer", in its ideology than its more successful relations in Italy and Germany.
Fascism in France attracted more intellectuals, writers, and theorists than in any other country, leaving the history of French fascist ideology especially rich in source materials.
Leftist Radical deputy Gaston Bergery's political drift makes him a prime example of Sternhell's fascism of the left.
24) "Antimaterialism" is one of Sternhell's links between fascism and the left - a link that connects Barres's aesthetics with Doriot's angry brawling, and Sorel's Reflections on Violence with Celines florid, ecstatic antisemitism.
his definition of fascism is necessarily a broad one, uprooted from the limited historical conditions peculiar to it; and many of the men he labels fascist because they had Fascist ideas, even though they "never donned brown shirts,"(28) would fall outside the borders of a stricter definition.
Once Gregor has established that fascism was a developmental dictatorship, meaning that both its inception and subsequent development depended upon narrowly circumscribed economic circumstances and policies, it becomes clear that, according to his definition, Italian fascism and German National Socialism, have little in common, since Germany was at a considerably higher stage of capitalist development.
This is perhaps the most compelling aspect of Gregor's work: in his definition, fascism becomes a transnational force that can move across time and space.
Whereas earlier studies of the French right wing focus on figures whose relationship to fascism constituted a fatal, rightward march (Drieu la Rochelle, Celine, Brasillach, Rebatet) or, at the very least, a shameful moment of past involvement (de Man, Blanchot) Avant-Garde Fascism discusses figures whose involvement with fascist movements was determined largely through aesthetics, such as Le Corbusier, Germaine Krull, Aristide Maillol, and others.
A richly documented work of intellectual historiography, Avant-Garde Fascism is essential reading for scholars and students of twentieth-century France, and of modernist art and literature more broadly.