Extortion

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Extortion

An illegal act in which one coerces another into providing money or something else of value. For example, one may extort money from a business by threat of force. Extortion historically has been common in organized crime.
References in periodicals archive ?
1979) (fearing that the tort would produce fraudulent, extortionary litigation; clarifying that rejection of the tort did not diminish "other remedies for interference with familial relationships" which made acceptance of the action "unnecessary as well as undesirable"); Edwards v.
The family's extortionary style of landlordism, known as rack-renting, brings ruin to the tenants, while the family's wastefulness brings ruin upon themselves; both groups are then exploited by a rapacious (and Catholic) middle class.
This type of legislation requires that many public agencies raise their own financing, typically through extortionary fees and inspections.
Jackson, engaging in true extortionary tactics; or, more poignantly,
Many of the extortionary groups are separatist-extremist organizations, supported indirectly by Pakistan and by corrupt Assam officials who receive kickbacks.
Unlike the carter and the widow, the summoner alienates himself from theologically efficacious language and the possibility of repentance while investing himself completely in his extortionary goal.
If paper was expensive, the cost of gut strings was simply extortionary. In Elizabethan England, for example, the cost of a year's supply of lute strings (which are virtually the same as the vihuela's) was equal to an admiral's annual salary.
By reducing both charges and defence to a merely textual debate, with all empirical evidence bracketed, Teltscher oddly ends up acquitting Hastings and the Company on fundamentally the same grounds as the original defence, namely that the charges against the East India Company's brutal and extortionary behaviour were no more than rhetorical performance.
There are a host of magnificently-drawn minor characters, starting with Abady's widowed and tyrannical old mother, her dishonest agent Azbej, the old Roumanian political Timisan, the men of the mountains who, one snowbound night, brutally murder an extortionary money-lender.
If there are just two people, one strong and one weak, the exchange of protection for tribute is clearly extortionary. Holcombe develops the idea that as the number of weak people grows, and as the strong become institutionalized within a set of rules that limit extortion while maintaining government's capacity to exercise coercion, the exchange may become much less extortionary.