exposure

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Risk

The uncertainty associated with any investment. That is, risk is the possibility that the actual return on an investment will be different from its expected return. A vitally important concept in finance is the idea that an investment that carries a higher risk has the potential of a higher return. For example, a zero-risk investment, such as a U.S. Treasury security, has a low rate of return, while a stock in a start-up has the potential to make an investor very wealthy, but also the potential to lose one's entire investment. Certain types of risk are easier to quantify than others. To the extent that risk is quantifiable, it is generally calculated as the standard deviation on an investment's average return.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

exposure

see EXCHANGE RATE EXPOSURE.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

exposure

(1) In finance,the amount that one may lose in an investment;the potential loss,which could be the capital invested plus any personal liability on loans in excess of the value of the property securing the loans. (2) In the market, the process of making a property known to the marketplace as available for sale or lease.(3) Physically, the direction of an improvement;for example,“The southern exposure of the house had all the best views.”

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
We calculated the between-pollutant Pearson correlations over time for each exposure estimation approach--and for each type of exposure error--to provide information on the collinearity of exposure estimates and exposure error that must be accounted for in a multipollutant model.
where [delta] is the exposure error, [X.sub.fine] is the exposure metric with the greater degree of refinement (i.e., increased spatial resolution or inclusion of weighting by population factors), var([x.sub.fine]) is the variance across days of [x.sub.fine], and P represents the model coefficients.
The goal of the present analysis was to examine exposure error and between-pollutant relationships and how these differ by pollutant pair and exposure metric.
Summary statistics for exposure error. The magnitude and spatial variability of the three types of normalized exposure error ([[DELTA].sub.spatial], [[delta].sub.population], and [[delta].sub.total]) across pollutants are presented in Figure 2A (see Supplemental Material, Figure S3A, for the full distribution).
To assess the potential for spatially differential exposure error, we compared the spatial variability of exposure errors across ZIP codes.
In one of the early papers on the topic of exposure error in studies of air pollution, Shy et al.
Because exposure measurement error may have substantial implications for interpreting epidemiologic studies on air pollution, particularly the time-series analyses, we developed one systematic conceptual formulation of the problem of exposure error in epidemiologic time-series studies of air pollution and considered the possible consequences for relative risk estimation.
The fundamental concepts of how exposure error can affect an epidemiologic study of pollution and health can be shown by considering the effects of exposure measurement error in a standard linear Gaussian regression model.
The degree of attenuation increases as the variance of the exposure error increases.
Following exposure errors, the second most common reason for repeats is positioning.
The next advance for this profession is digital radiography -- a technology so sophisticated that it can virtually eliminate repeats due to exposure errors. Digital systems permit underexposures as great as 80% and overexposures up to 200%.
False positive exposure errors and low exposure prevalence in community-based case-control studies.