exposure

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Risk

The uncertainty associated with any investment. That is, risk is the possibility that the actual return on an investment will be different from its expected return. A vitally important concept in finance is the idea that an investment that carries a higher risk has the potential of a higher return. For example, a zero-risk investment, such as a U.S. Treasury security, has a low rate of return, while a stock in a start-up has the potential to make an investor very wealthy, but also the potential to lose one's entire investment. Certain types of risk are easier to quantify than others. To the extent that risk is quantifiable, it is generally calculated as the standard deviation on an investment's average return.

exposure

see EXCHANGE RATE EXPOSURE.

exposure

(1) In finance,the amount that one may lose in an investment;the potential loss,which could be the capital invested plus any personal liability on loans in excess of the value of the property securing the loans. (2) In the market, the process of making a property known to the marketplace as available for sale or lease.(3) Physically, the direction of an improvement;for example,“The southern exposure of the house had all the best views.”

References in periodicals archive ?
The goal of the present analysis was to examine exposure error and between-pollutant relationships and how these differ by pollutant pair and exposure metric.
The magnitude and spatial variability of the three types of normalized exposure error ([[DELTA].
population] for CO, the spatial variability of exposure error was greater for local pollutants than regional pollutants (Figure 2A,C).
The collinearity of exposure error was examined based on Pearson correlations between daily exposure error for local-local and regional-regional pollutant pairs (Figure 2B; see also Supplemental Material, Figure S3B, for local-regional pairs).
3]), variance across days of the normalized exposure error had very little spatial variability (i.
The fundamental concepts of how exposure error can affect an epidemiologic study of pollution and health can be shown by considering the effects of exposure measurement error in a standard linear Gaussian regression model.
The degree of attenuation increases as the variance of the exposure error increases.
It is useful to establish these results on the effects of exposure error on simple linear regression coefficients and helpful to do so in advance of considering a multiple regression case.
To investigate the effects of exposure error in the log-linear regressions widely used to assess the pollutant-mortality association, consider the following model for an individual's risk of mortality: