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Export

A good produced in one country and sold to a customer in another country. Exports bring money into the producing country; for that reason, many economists believe that a nation's proper balance of trade means more exports are sold than imports bought. Exports may be difficult to sell in some countries, as the importers may put up various protectionist measures such as import quotas and tariffs. Most governments seek to promote exports, while they have differing positions on imports. See also: Free trade, NAFTA.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

export

A good or service that is produced in one country and then sold to and consumed in another country. Because many companies are heavily dependent on exports for sales, any factors such as government policies or exchange rates that affect exports can have significant impact on corporate profits. Compare import. See also balance of trade.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

export

  1. a good which is produced in the home country and which is then physically transported to, and sold in, an overseas market earning foreign exchange for the home country (visible export).
  2. a service which is provided for foreigners either in the home country (for example visits by tourists) or overseas (for example banking, insurance) which likewise generates foreign exchange for the home country (invisible export).
  3. capital which is placed abroad in the form of portfolio investment, foreign direct investment in physical assets, and banking deposits (capital export). See FOREIGN INVESTMENT.

    Together these items comprise, along with IMPORTS, a country's BALANCE OF PAYMENTS. See INTERNATIONAL TRADE, EXPORTING, EXPORT CREDIT GUARANTEE DEPARTMENT, EXPORT RESTRAINT AGREEMENT, EXPORT SUBSIDY.

Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson
Exportclick for a larger image
Fig. 68 Export. (a) UK goods and services exports, 2003.

(b) Geographical distribution of UK goods/services exports, 2003. Source: UK Balance of Payments, ONS, 2004.

export

a good, service or capital asset that is sold to foreign countries. (i) A good that is produced in the home country and is then physically transported to, and sold in, an overseas market, earning foreign exchange for the home country, is called a visible export. (ii) A service that is provided for foreigners either in the home country (for example, visits by tourists) or overseas (for example, banking, insurance) which likewise generates foreign exchange for the home country is called an invisible export. (iii) Capital that is placed abroad in the form of portfolio investment, foreign direct investment in physical assets and banking deposits is called a capital export. Exports are important in two main respects:
  1. together with IMPORTS they make up a country's BALANCE OF PAYMENTS - a country must export in order to finance (‘pay for’ in foreign currency terms) its imports. The combined net payment figures (exports minus imports) for (i), (ii) and (iii) are shown in Fig. 13 (a), BALANCE OF PAYMENTS entry.
  2. they represent an ‘injection’ into the CIRCULAR FLOW OF NATIONAL INCOME, serving to raise real income and output. In 2003, exports accounted for 20% of gross final expenditure (GFE) on domestically produced output (GFE minus imports = GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT). See Fig. 133 (b) , NATIONAL INCOME ACCOUNTS entry Fig. 68 gives details of the product composition and geographical distribution of UK (merchandise) goods exports in 2003. See Fig. 84 , for comparable import data (IMPORT entry). See INTERNATIONAL TRADE, EXPORT MULTIPLIER, C.I.F. ( COST- INSURANCE-FREIGHT), F.O.B. ( FREE-ONBOARD), CERTIFICATE OF ORIGIN, INSURANCE, FACTORING, FORFAITING, EXPORT SUBSIDY, EXPORT RESTRAINT AGREEMENT, FOREIGN INVESTMENT, EXCHANGE RATE, EXCHANGE RATE EXPOSURE, TERMS OF TRADE.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Les exportations de la vannerie ont accuse, au contraire, une forte chute de 100 pc suivies de celles des produits du cuivre (-95,69 pc) et des articles en bois (-88,71 pc).
Ainsi, les chiffres montrent que les exportations du groupe Office cherifien des phosphates (OCP) ont baisse de 15,8 pc, en passant de 6,32 a fin fevrier 2012 a 5,32 a fin fevrier dernier, sous l'effet du recul des ventes des phosphates et des derivees.
La conserve de sardine represente le produit phare qui place le Maroc comme leader mondial sur ce marche et lui attribue une part importante dans les exportations mondiales des produits de la mer.
Une relation triangulaire pour assurer les exportations, les credits et le prefinancement et le refinancement des exportations sera adoptee cette annee.
Les exportations de l'Algerie ont atteint 16,43 milliards de dollars contre 17,48 milliards de dollars a la meme periode, soit en baisse de 6,02%, due essentiellement a un recul des exportations des hydrocarbures.
L'Algerie doit se doter d'une strategie nationale pour la promotion des exportations hors hydrocarbures, soutenue notamment par une politique de developpement de l'investissement et de l'agriculture, recommande, dans son rapport, le groupe de travail charge de la protection et de la promotion de la production nationale, issu de la tripartite tenue en octobre dernier.