population

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population

  1. the total number of people resident in a country at a particular point in time. The UK, for example, had a population of 59 million people in 2004. The size of the population is determined by past and present birth and death rates, together with net migration trends – the number of people leaving the country to live abroad (emigration) compared with the number entering the country to take up residence (immigration). The UK birth rate is currently 11 births per 1000 of the population per annum and the death rate 10 per 1000 of the population per annum. In most advanced countries, both birth and death rates have declined over the long run because of rising living standards and improved medical care; this has produced slow-growing, ageing populations.

    The total size of the population and its composition in terms of proportion of males to females and age-group distributions, combined with various SOCIOECONOMIC factors influencing buying characteristics, are important to businesses in assessing the market potential for their products.

  2. all possible observations of a certain phenomenon in statistical analysis, for example incomes of all people resident in a country. Where it is too time-consuming and expensive to record all possible observations it is necessary to take a SAMPLE, for example the incomes of 1000 citizens, and generalize about the incomes of all citizens from this sample. See STATISTICAL INFERENCE.
Populationclick for a larger image
Fig. 144 Population. The UK birth and death rates, measured in numbers per 1,000 of the population, from 1740 to 2004.

population

the total number of people resident in a country. The size of the population is determined by past and present BIRTH RATES and DEATH RATES as well as MIGRATION trends. In most advanced industrial countries, both birth and death rates have declined over the long run (see DEMOGRAPHIC TRANSITION), which has produced slow-growing populations. The size and growth of a country's population determine the size of the LABOUR FORCE that is available to produce output, a country's GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT divided by its population providing a measure of the country's general prosperity (see INCOME PER HEAD). In 2004 the UK's population was 59 million (see Fig. 144 ). By comparison, the population of Germany was 82 million, the USA 288 million, Japan 127 million, India 1,048 million and China 1,281 million.
References in periodicals archive ?
Regulations promulgated by FWS give the Secretary authority to introduce an experimental population "outside the species' current natural range," but "within its probable historic range.
Wolves were managed as a nonessential, experimental population in these areas and removal following livestock conflicts was the primary cause of mortality.
We then test these qualitative predictions using data from field experiments, in which we manipulated the magnitude of initial size variation within experimental populations of the generalist grasshopper, M.
McKittrick argued that the Canadian wolves transported to Yellowstone to create the experimental population were neither endangered nor threatened because wolves in Canada are not endangered.
formosa by carrying out a series of crosses using fish from two North Florida populations (the Wacissa River and Trout Pond) and used them to initiate replicate experimental populations in artificial ponds.
Spread of anther-smut disease (Ustilago violacea) and character correlations in a genetically variable experimental population of Silene alba.
A contrast of seedling survival in the "natural" mast community seed and seedlings with the experimentally sown seed reveals that the experimental population lost more than twice as many seeds and seedlings per week at either site compared with Shorea communities during the same sampling interval.
To address these questions I tagged [less than] 3500 individual flowers to track seed set on a per-day basis, performed a hand-pollination experiment, and quantified pollinator visitation throughout the flowering season in an experimental population of Lythrum salicaria.
Recently applied for the first time to a predator (a red wolf population to be released this summer in North Carolina), an experimental population is defined as one at a specific site that cannot be hunted--yet individual problem animals can be removed or destroyed.
This small experimental population is not currently self-sustaining, but it has yielded valuable information for palila recovery.

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