Evergreen

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Evergreen

A contract that rolls over after each agreed (short-term) period until cancelled by one party.

Evergreen

Describing a long-term contract that is renewed automatically after a short-term period unless it is terminated. For example, an evergreen contract may last five years with an option to terminate at the end of one year. Unless one party or the other terminates the contract by the end of the first year, it is renewed for an additional five years after the end of the first five years.
References in classic literature ?
"No, I'll never love anybody but you, Tom, and I'll never marry anybody but you -- and you ain't to ever marry anybody but me, either."
Then I ain't the first you've ever been engaged to!"
"His regard for her, infinitely surpassing anything that Willoughby ever felt or feigned, as much more warm, as more sincere or constant--which ever we are to call it-- has subsisted through all the knowledge of dear Marianne's unhappy prepossession for that worthless young man!--and without selfishness--without encouraging a hope!--could he have seen her happy with another--Such a noble mind!-- such openness, such sincerity!--no one can be deceived in HIM."
Time, a very little time, I tell him, will do everything;--Marianne's heart is not to be wasted for ever on such a man as Willoughby.-- His own merits must soon secure it."
I think my darling girl is more beautiful than ever. The sorrow that has been in her face--for it is not there now--seems to have purified even its innocent expression and to have given it a diviner quality.
"My dear Dame Durden," said Allan, drawing my arm through his, "do you ever look in the glass?"
"Be under no apprehension, Miss Manette, of my ever resuming this conversation by so much as a passing word.
For men think that they earn their honors hardly, and pity them sometimes; and pity ever healeth envy.
Peggotty, 'as reg'lar as the night comes, the candle must be stood in its old pane of glass, that if ever she should see it, it may seem to say "Come back, my child, come back!" If ever there's a knock, Ham (partic'ler a soft knock), arter dark, at your aunt's door, doen't you go nigh it.
She was ashamed of Isabella, and ashamed of having ever loved her.
I remember tumbling into a huge dust-hole when a very small boy, but I have not the faintest recollection of ever getting out again; and if memory were all we had to trust to, I should be compelled to believe I was there still.
'When did MY eyes ever deceive-- unless it was a young woman!