evaluation

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evaluation

A study of potential property uses, but not value.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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To evaluate this response, relaxation tests were performed at room temperature with lubricant on all of the samples noted previously.
The purposes of the assessment are to enable the committee members to evaluate the specific risks that they perceive might affect their organization, to develop a work plan to audit these areas of risk, and to take corrective action.
To evaluate organizational performance, I suggest The Drucker Foundation Self-Assessment Tool: Participant Workbook (Drucker Foundation and Jossey-Bass, Inc., 1999), www.pfdf.org/leaderbooks/sat.
Having the opportunity to use all of the projectors on the same day, in the same type of classroom, and evaluate ease of setup gave the committee a clearer idea about which projector met their needs.
Apartment owners and managers can now expedite and improve the tenant screening process with TenantAlert, a new Internet- based tenant screening service that instantly evaluates each prospective renter against national consumer credit data, criminal and eviction databases, two separate colorblind scoring systems designed to predict tenant reliability, and a variety of other criteria.
As companies evaluate their business continuance needs, many are moving to a centralized storage model that allows them to mirror, replicate and backup their data without interfering with individual servers and, in most cases, without significant impact to the performance of the LAN.
"This contingency DST will deploy from multiple locations, come together on very short notice, and we will then evaluate their ability to accomplish our mission as one team," said Gitto.
To evaluate such factors as friction in old and new splice designs, Leech has added his model of splice behavior into software that previously could predict only the behavior of unspliced rope.--P.W.
As coaches, we have to ask ourselves: Can we help our athletes by using similar instruments to evaluate their skills?
In order to evaluate the instructional quality of these materials, selected "principles of good instruction" from Astleitner (2002) are used within a narrative evaluation procedure.
Once you have the master list, it's time to analyze and evaluate them.
And, more importantly, how do we prudently evaluate the financial impact of these changes and translate that evaluation into adjustments in the clinical setting?