Ethics

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Ethics

Standards of conduct or moral judgment.

Ethics

The study and practice of appropriate behavior, regardless of the behavior's legality. Certain industries have professional organizations setting and promoting certain ethical standards. For example, an accountant may be required to refrain from engaging in aggressive accounting, even when a particular type of aggressive accounting is not illegal. Professional organizations may censure or revoke the licenses of those professionals who are found to have violated the ethical standards of their fields.

In investing, ethics helps inform the investment decisions of some individuals and companies. For example, an individual may have a moral objection to smoking and therefore refrain from investing in tobacco companies. Ethics may be both positive and negative in investing; that is, it may inform where an individual makes investments (e.g. in environmentally friendly companies) and where he/she does not (e.g. in arms manufacturers). Some mutual funds and even whole subdivisions are dedicated to promoting ethical investing. See also: Green fund, Islamic finance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Berys Gaut argues that ethical criticism of art is a proper and legitimate aesthetic activity, that `if a work manifests ethically reprehensible attitudes, it is to that extent aesthetically defective, and if a work manifests ethically commendable attitudes, it is to that extent aesthetically meritorious'.(9) He calls this view ethicism. Noel Carroll labels a similar view moderate moralism.(10) We will be arguing that while ethical criticism of works of art is a legitimate activity, neither Gaut nor Carroll have succeeded in showing that the endorsement of an ethically reprehensible attitude entails that a work is in any sense aesthetically flawed.
He calls this view ethicism. Gaut's view deserves special attention since the reasons he offers for ethicism are quite different from those offered by Carroll for moderate moralism.
The argument for ethicism presented by Gaut can be summarized as follows: