Ethics

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Ethics

Standards of conduct or moral judgment.

Ethics

The study and practice of appropriate behavior, regardless of the behavior's legality. Certain industries have professional organizations setting and promoting certain ethical standards. For example, an accountant may be required to refrain from engaging in aggressive accounting, even when a particular type of aggressive accounting is not illegal. Professional organizations may censure or revoke the licenses of those professionals who are found to have violated the ethical standards of their fields.

In investing, ethics helps inform the investment decisions of some individuals and companies. For example, an individual may have a moral objection to smoking and therefore refrain from investing in tobacco companies. Ethics may be both positive and negative in investing; that is, it may inform where an individual makes investments (e.g. in environmentally friendly companies) and where he/she does not (e.g. in arms manufacturers). Some mutual funds and even whole subdivisions are dedicated to promoting ethical investing. See also: Green fund, Islamic finance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many ethicians continue simply to describe ethical codes and systems, but rapid globalization has forced the recognition that normative ethics, too, needs to be developed--albeit in ways that start by searching for common ground recognized by people of all cultures.
It will also be helpful to ethicians, for there is a popular tendency to dismiss too easily the relevance of the biblical message for our moral lives.
Certainly critical social ethicians might probe a bit more deeply into the presumptions and implications that lie behind this notion, and although B.
Christian ethicians will find this book very useful even if they disagree with some of S.
15) He only hints at the massive contribution of Protestant social ethicians, such as the Niebuhr brothers, Tillich, and Barth, who employed "the Protestant principle" as a creative critique of society, and he locates the flaw in our cultural code within the American Protestant tradition.