Ethics

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Ethics

Standards of conduct or moral judgment.

Ethics

The study and practice of appropriate behavior, regardless of the behavior's legality. Certain industries have professional organizations setting and promoting certain ethical standards. For example, an accountant may be required to refrain from engaging in aggressive accounting, even when a particular type of aggressive accounting is not illegal. Professional organizations may censure or revoke the licenses of those professionals who are found to have violated the ethical standards of their fields.

In investing, ethics helps inform the investment decisions of some individuals and companies. For example, an individual may have a moral objection to smoking and therefore refrain from investing in tobacco companies. Ethics may be both positive and negative in investing; that is, it may inform where an individual makes investments (e.g. in environmentally friendly companies) and where he/she does not (e.g. in arms manufacturers). Some mutual funds and even whole subdivisions are dedicated to promoting ethical investing. See also: Green fund, Islamic finance.
References in periodicals archive ?
The survey instrument used a seven-point Likert scale to obtain opinions on accounting ethics categories and topics.
Using in-depth interviews, the researchers of the studies reviewed for this article investigated successful professional service firms to identify the elements of a collaboration ethic (Haskins, Liedtka, and Rosenblum, 1998).
Marks, director, Ethics Awareness and International Operations, Lockheed Martin Corporation; Michael J.
This collection of transcripts would make an excellent primary text for use in ethics courses or in courses requiring deeper understanding of postmodernism and communication scholarship.
In creating the Code of Ethics, the SCCE establishes both overarching principles to guide compliance officials and rules of conduct, which represent specific standards that prescribe the minimum level of professional conduct expected of CEPs.
Professor Somerville holds that by developing a sense of the "sacredness of a human being that is not dependent on anything but his or her biological and psychological characteristics, one can develop an ethics that will respect the dignity of all.
So long as fear is present in an organization, ethics, the base component of organizational culture, are threatened.
A week ago, we said Gil Garcetti should resign from the Ethics Commission because of the appearance of a conflict of interest involving his son.
Voices from religious ethics communities offer resources for recovering language of community and rethinking the familiar grounds of social justice debates in forming an ethical response to the American health care reform crisis.
The result of such practices, say some in the ethics business, is likely to be a new attitude toward the economics of compliance.
2003 by the Professional Ethics Executive Committee and became effective for new engagements on Dec.