equipment

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Equipment

Tangible assets that are peripheral to a company's operations but are nonetheless necessary. Equipment is generally moveable and may be more or less expensive than other equipment. Trucks to transport materials and toilet paper for customer bathrooms are both examples of equipment.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

equipment

Fixed assets that are acquired as additions or supplements to more permanent assets. Equipment includes lighting fixtures in a building, for example. Equipment, unlike real estate, is generally moveable.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

equipment

small items of capital such as a hand drill or screwdriver which are used to produce goods. See PLANT, MACHINERY, CAPITAL STOCK, FIXED ASSET.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson
References in classic literature ?
The mail coat, a spear, a shield, that I did not know how to use, a couple of /tollas/, a revolver, and a huge plume, which I pinned into the top of my shooting hat, in order to give a bloodthirsty finish to my appearance, completed my modest equipment. In addition to all these articles, of course we had our rifles, but as ammunition was scarce, and as they would be useless in case of a charge, we arranged that they should be carried behind us by bearers.
The bones were in a fair state of preservation and indicated by their intactness that the flesh had probably been picked from them by vultures as none was broken; but the pieces of equipment bore out the suggestion of their great age.
This was as far as it would be convenient to use the canoes, the guide told Tom and his friends, and from there on the trip to the Copan valley would be made on the backs of mules, which would carry most of the baggage and equipment. The heavier portions would be transported in ox-carts.