model

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Model

Any mathematical formula or other structure that economists use to explain or predict occurrences. Economists test their models with real world facts before they gain wide acceptance, but, even then, there is no guarantee that a model will always be a correct predictor. See also: Model risk.

model

An abstraction of reality, generally referring in investments to a mathematical formula designed to determine security values. Economists also use models to project trends in economic variables such as interest rates, economic activity, and inflation rates.

model

see ECONOMIC MODEL.
References in periodicals archive ?
In recent years, application of the epidemiological model in WSN has become increasingly widespread [29].
White, "Directed-graph epidemiological models of computer viruses," in Proceedings of the IEEE Computer Society Symposium on Research in Security and Privacy, pp.
The simulated culled number was very close to the exact number, therefore we consider this epidemiological model to be appropriate.
We assume that one way of showing change of behaviour, which is represented in the epidemiological model by the proportion of individuals who withdraw from risky sexual behaviour, p, is by the use of condoms.
There are many research works about epidemiological models; see [13-23] and the references therein.
Maini, "A Lyapunov function and global properties for SIR and SEIR epidemiological models with nonlinear incidence," Mathematical Biosciences and Engineering, vol.
P Leahy, "An epidemiological model of rift valley fever," Electronic Journal of Differential Equations, vol.
Keywords Direct economic damage * Natural disaster * Epidemiological model
The SIS model is an epidemiological model in which the population, once infected, does not gain any immunity from the disease.
Persistence theory has so far focused rather on ecological than epidemiological models. In the epidemiology of infectious disease persistence has two faces: persistence (or endemicity) of the disease and survival of the host population.
If a risk manager knows those factors about a population and a disease, he or she can fairly accurately predict the future course of that disease with a simple epidemiological model. If asked to provide advice on the risk to company flora a new disease, the ask manager can reverse-engineer the driving factors from data provided daily by organizations such as the World Health Organization (WHO), the Centers for Disease Control of the National Institute of Health and Prevention.

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