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Related to enthalpy: entropy, Gibbs free energy

H

Fifth letter of a Nasdaq stock symbol specifying that the issue is the second preferred bond of the company.
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H

Used in stock transaction tables in newspapers to indicate that during the day's activity the stock traded at a new 52-week high price.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Relationship between Entropy and Enthalpy with Lithium Intercalation.
In the radial turbine, the fluid performs work on the impeller blades resulting in a drop in enthalpy of:
(2010) [64] are in excellent agreement with the experimental enthalpy of formation of O atom (within about 0.2 kJ [mol.sup.-1]).
Enthalpy of freon vapor entering the 2nd stage high pressure compressor
You might have thought that we don't have to worry about enthalpy with regard to the liquid-to-vapor transition because we won't be boiling our fish.
Typically packed with a rooftop air handling unit, the device includes a series of dampers, enthalpy sensors or dry bulb controls, actuators, and linkages.
* fixed enthalpy- outdoor air enthalpy less than a set value
It adds the concept of constant drying air enthalpy as a quantitative physical indicator for the adjustment of the heat and mass balances in each evolutionary step of the process.
Inspite of lack of any thermal event being associated with this diluent, ofloxacin experienced an enthalpy gain of as much as 37% (Table 5).
The comparison of the values of enthalpies of combustion Ii and the amount of oxygen ni required for the combustion of one mole of amide in Table-2 demonstrates the presence of a simple pattern - the greater the cost of oxygen for the complete combustion of one mole of a combustible substance, the greater the absolute value of the enthalpy of combustion.