delivery

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Delivery

The tender and receipt of an actual commodity or financial instrument in settlement of a futures contract.

Delivery

The transfer of a security or an underlying asset to a buyer. The term is often used in options, forward, and futures contracts, in which payment and delivery are separated by a relatively long period of time. Most of the time, however, delivery does not occur, as most traders offset their positions with opposite contracts.

delivery

1. The transfer of a security to an investor's broker in order to satisfy an executed sell order. Delivery is required by the settlement date.
2. The transfer of a specified commodity in order to meet the requirements of a commodity contract that has been sold.

delivery

The transfer of possession from one person to another.Deeds and leases require delivery before they are effective. Delivery does not depend on manual transfer, but does depend on the intent of the parties. Deeds are delivered when placed within the possession or control of the grantee in such a manner that the grantor cannot regain possession or control.

References in periodicals archive ?
[section] Early elective delivery (before 39 weeks) [dagger] The number of babies whose delivery was purposely scheduled in weeks 37 and 38, before the baby is fully developed.
Enter Dodd and colleagues, who conducted their randomized, controlled trial to assess the risks and benefits of elective delivery of twins at 37 weeks.
It includes a literature review about the risks of early elective delivery, a step-by-step guide for hospital leaders who want to eliminate early elective deliveries, a guide for measuring and tracking quality improvement, sample forms and case studies, and educational tools for clinicians, staff, and patients.
There was still a wide variation among the hospitals in the Leapfrog survey with early elective delivery rates ranging from a low of less than 5% to more than 40%, according to the 2011 data.
health insurers - Aetna, CIGNA, UnitedHealthcare, and Wellpoint - will conduct a campaign to educate expectant mothers about the importance of a full gestation and the wisdom of comparing elective delivery rates in their local hospitals, Ms.
"I don't think patients or their obstetric providers would consider this an 'elective delivery'"
The authors estimated that, at 37 weeks' gestation, postponing elective delivery until 39 weeks might prevent 48% of cases of the primary outcome; this percentage was estimated to be 27% at 38 weeks' gestation.
In a 5-year program, reeducation of physicians and nurses on the hazards of early-term elective delivery, combined with policing of their practices, reduced the rate of early elective deliveries from 28% of all elective deliveries in 1999-2000 to less than 10% within 6 months of program initiation.