strength

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Price Momentum

The performance of a stock relative to its industry or the performance of an industry relative to the market as a whole. A stock (or industry) that outperforms its industry (or market) for a given period of time is seen as a bullish sign for that stock (or industry). The concept is also called relative strength.

strength

References in periodicals archive ?
The current study sought to reduce Barron's (1953) Es scale to a more manageable length and include items that appear to best tap the construct of ego strength among college students.
Although "ego strength" was universally accepted as a significant predictor of psychotherapeutic success (Kernberg, et al., 1972), there was widespread disagreement on the identity, description, and measurement of "ego strength" itself, due to the reluctance of conflicting theoretical positions to unequivocally define and clearly distinguish between often reified terms like "identity", "self", and "ego" (compounded by the oft-mistaken view that all uses of the term "ego" were more or less synonymous).
The ego strengths are associated with successful resolutions of the psychosocial stages, and they are thought to provide the basis for positive personality and social functioning throughout the lifespan (Erikson, 1968).
Ego strength negatively influences piracy intention in the full model and in the case of software piracy.
* 2 subjects have a low emotional stability and ego strength.
"These challenges demand ego strength, self-direction, and motivation--qualities that can be difficult even for people without mental illness."
The authors identify more than twenty types of corrective experiences, and suggest that they all fit into one of three categories: (1) building ego strength through release of shame and reclaiming worthiness; (2) building agency through release of helplessness and reclaiming personal power; and (3) building authenticity through release of dissociation and identification and reclaiming self-reflective identity.
Four goals of ethics training which supervisors should consider include: (a) sensitizing individuals to ethical issues, (b) improving individuals' abilities to reason about ethical issues, (c) helping individuals develop "moral responsibility and ego strength to act in ethical ways," and (d) assisting individuals to tolerate "the ambiguity of ethical decision making" (Kitchener, 1986, p.
Build ego strength: Release of shame (reclaiming worthiness)
Erikson has characterized adolescent identity exploration as being accompanied by fluctuations in ego strength. Cognitive destructuring, generally, and the view of the self, in particular, was seen to result in reduced ego strength and impairment of coping.
What is commonly termed "ego strength" reflects, in this model, sufficient resources available to functional adult ego states that regression to outgrown, outmoded or developmentally arrested coping mechanisms which were appropriate only at an earlier age will not need to be called upon.
This can be a highly effective therapeutic technique when used with children (Tilton, 1984), giving the child someone with whom he/she can identify as a source of ego strength and security.