Ecology

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Ecology

The study of how living things interact with their surroundings. For example, an ecologist may study how a plant operates in different types of soil or whether or not bacteria thrive in various environs. Ecology is important in sustainable development to ensure that an action does not irreparably harm an environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ecological economics can function as a great unifier.
Ramensky [11] showed the real possibility of using the ecological properties of plants for determining the expressivity of abiotic factors.
Maintain ecological justice: The civilization of a society needs to be just to be reflected by justice.
2 Methods of Ecological Green Equivalent Calculation and Ecosystem Analysis
The two types of external validity are: (a) population validity--the extent to which study results from a specific sample can be applied to larger similar groups, and (b) ecological validity-the extent to which an experimental design can be generalized to a set of environmental conditions or contexts (Brewer, 2000).
The following nine case studies of harvesting and management of widely differing NTFPs illustrate clearly that to assess ecological sustainability we need studies that seriously address the specifics of the harvesting of NTFPs and the ecological system that supports its production, and that this may require long-term and resource-intensive studies.
Advocates for ecological literacy suggest place-based learning as effective pedagogical theory because it is adaptive to each particular location's own wealth of unique cultural, ecological and social characteristics (Monaghan & Curthoys, 2008).
In the face of this, it has been argued that the promotion of ecological citizenship should be approached together with the ecological transformation of the state (Barry, 2006, 1999; Eckersley, 2004; Christoff, 2005, 1996).
Drawing on the lessons of actual restoration projects such as Chicago Wilderness, Common Ground Relief, and Vermont Family Forests, the book successfully presents a clear introduction to important theories and activities of ecological restoration.
The ecological thought', Morton writes 'is the thinking of interconnectedness in the fullest and deepest sense' (p7).
Boons insists that the ecological impact of any product depends on the human practices that accompany its production and consumption (the way in which ecological impact of production and consumption activities is perceived plays a central role in how firms deal with this impact).
Ecological figures come from the Global Footprint Network and measure resource consumption and waste produced by a country in comparison to its carrying capacity as expressed in locally available resources such as agricultural land and energy.