Eco-Label

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Eco-Label

A label attached to a consumer good indicating that it is energy efficient, was produced sustainably, or is otherwise environmentally friendly. Different jurisdictions have different rules governing what products may qualify for eco-labels. Some countries and industries have voluntary schemes with standards set by professional bodies, while others use mandatory, government-issued labels.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Previous studies revealed that, the consumers 'purchasing decisions are significantly affected by the consideration of the product impacts on the environment, and based on this empirical evidence should be highlighting the significant role of eco-labels in increasing the perceived behavioural control in consumers, too [3].
Some eco-labels require a waiver to use certain substances in the production process.
We assume that when there is product differentiation in the market, eco-conscious consumers buy the product with the eco-label and eco-indifferent consumers buy the product without the label because the un-labeled products are usually priced less.
The eco-labels were presented by CYMEPA, the non-governmental organisation dealing with the environment and clean seas, and a member of the Foundation for Environmental Education (FEE).
This Note examines the value of state-backed eco-labeling schemes, the potential implications of US-Tuna II for the WTO's approach to accommodating nontrade interests, and potential adjustments within the current WTO framework for eco-labels. Part II describes the Appellate Body's reasoning in US-Tuna II.
BookDifferent.com users sifting through the website's more than 245,000 hotels can now siphon out all the ones that are not eco-labeled in the same way that one might search for hotels by the facilities they offer.
432 Number of eco-labels worldwide being tracked by EcoLabel Index,
Major international companies such as Hewlett-Packard, Nestle, Canon, Sara Lee and E.ON took part in the study, which first sought to investigate why firms adopt eco-labels.
With other certification programs and Type I eco-labels, certain benchmarks are set.
In addition to increased regulation of general claims, the commission included a new section on eco-labels, encouraging companies to use labels with specific environmental claims and warning them not to use labels they haven't actually earned.