Echo Chamber

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Echo Chamber

The tendency of members of a group to reinforce each other's views and not to contradict each other because there is little or no information presented from outside the group. An echo chamber is dangerous in business as one member may not see a flaw in another's thinking or may be afraid to point it out. However, the term is most commonly used in media to describe a self-reinforcing story. See also: Groupism.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The most concerning effect of echo chambers has been the increasing gaps in knowledge among the public because they are only engaging in information they trust that aligns with their views (Bennett & Iyengar, 2008) and they no longer see the validity in opposing views (Huckfeldt, Mendez, & Osborn, 2004; Price, Cappella, & Nir, 2002).
To further complicate this confirmation bias and the echo chamber effect, the algorithms used by social media platforms like Twitter and Facebook are not necessarily designed to provide users with the most accurate and timely information.
The social structure of political echo chambers: Variation in ideological homophily in online networks.
What happens when the out-group disappears or becomes so homogenous that no significant rebuttal to your echo chamber occurs?
Their next steps will involve studying messages that improbably make it over the walls of different echo chambers, the better to determine how social and cognitive biases can be overcome on a network-wide scale.
Republicans have done a stunning job of using conservative political blogs as an echo chamber. The social hierarchy of Republican blogs is top down, with more popular blogs promoting those less popular blogs that agree with them.
Echo chambers that are deeper from front to back will send the wavelengths out farther.
Unfortunately, the truth about voting fraud--that it is largely unsubstantiated allegation--is increasingly drowned out in the echo chambers of state legislatures.
Many pro-war voices constantly accuse the media of anti-war and anti-Bush biases, with the accusations routinely amplified in mass-media echo chambers. Cranking up the volume are powerhouse outlets like Fox News, the Wall Street Journal editorial page, the New York Post, the Washington Times, the Weekly Standard, legions of high-profile loyalist pundits, and literally hundreds of radio talk-show hosts across the country who have political outlooks similar to Rush Limbaugh's.
[The author of the final article] warns that although it's easier than ever to create our own personal echo chambers, we risk confining ourselves to information that only reinforces what we already believe....
Failing this, we will find ourselves within "echo chambers" that lead to social fragmentation: we will only learn from and interact with those who already agree with us.
In fact, he is scrupulous in leaving it to readers to probe the depths of his observations in the echo chambers of their own hearts.