Earmark

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Earmark

1. To set aside money to use only for a certain, stated purpose. Earmarking is common in both personal savings and in corporate finance, as well as in government. For example, an individual may earmark reserves for his/her honeymoon and a company may do the same to pay off bonds when they mature. Likewise, a politician may earmark government funds for a project in his/her district. When politicians earmark funds, the word takes on a slightly negative connotation. See also: Pork barrel spending.

2. Money that has been earmarked.
References in periodicals archive ?
"I would be supportive of earmarks," Lowey, a Democrat from New York,(https://www.politico.com/newsletters/playbook/2019/01/05/shutdown-negotiations-drag-on-371052) told Politico.
There are many reasons Congress should consider restoring earmarks. The first reason is that it is a matter of constitutional importance.
the argument against earmarks appears straightforward: It's unseemly to trade money for votes.
Democrats could request earmarks, but the Republicans are refusing to accept the disclosure forms--thereby putting any Democrat who makes a request in technical violation of the Rules of the House.
Two telling examples of small earmarks that brought funds directly to populations that needed them most--populations that lack "connections" or "clout," but are deeply deserving of support--were announced in July 2010, shortly before the informal moratorium on earmarks took hold.
Well, it wouldn't be farfetched to blame a bit of the divisive partisan climate of the last several years on the significant reduction in earmarks, that is, on the inability of policy makers to gain support through patronage.
He then quoted Santorum in 2009 saying that he had "a lot of earmarks" and was proud of the ones he had put in his bills.
AU asserts that the earmark is only the latest in a string of questionable diversions for religious purposes.
Members of the congressional appropriations committees have an advantage over their colleagues in their access to earmarks. The chairmen of the committees have the greatest advantage of all.
There were also no earmarks in the congressional measure authorizing a second round of $350 billion in TARP funding to bail out major financial institutions.
Heath has been a reporter with the Seattle Times since 1999 and, along with his work on earmarks, has written investigative pieces on topics such as terrorism, corporate deception, and medical research.