Earmark

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Earmark

1. To set aside money to use only for a certain, stated purpose. Earmarking is common in both personal savings and in corporate finance, as well as in government. For example, an individual may earmark reserves for his/her honeymoon and a company may do the same to pay off bonds when they mature. Likewise, a politician may earmark government funds for a project in his/her district. When politicians earmark funds, the word takes on a slightly negative connotation. See also: Pork barrel spending.

2. Money that has been earmarked.
References in periodicals archive ?
the argument against earmarks appears straightforward: It's unseemly to trade money for votes.
So, how can earmarks be brought back effectively and administered justly?
I rather think it is because the proposed spending plan is packed with earmarks.
A few earmarks that make the news each year seem clearly outrageous, sometimes foolish and sometimes downright embarrassing - as when a member directly benefits a major campaign contributor.
Talmadge Heflin, the director of the Center for Fiscal Policy at the conservative Texas Public Policy Foundation, doesn't think eliminating earmarks will eliminate all the spending.
The earmarks go disproportionately to members of the appropriations committees.
However, if the Congress instead had designated exactly how to allocate the $700 billion via earmarks, then the executive branch would have been bound to allocate the funds according to those earmarks.
issued a series of memoranda regarding earmarks originated by Congress.
began in March when APME organized 10 training seminars at different newspaper locations that focused on database research of earmarks and that cross-reference reviews of campaign contributions.
Attorney General Michael Mukasey and three other cabinet-level officials challenging 26 questionable earmarks to religious organizations.