Earmark

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Earmark

1. To set aside money to use only for a certain, stated purpose. Earmarking is common in both personal savings and in corporate finance, as well as in government. For example, an individual may earmark reserves for his/her honeymoon and a company may do the same to pay off bonds when they mature. Likewise, a politician may earmark government funds for a project in his/her district. When politicians earmark funds, the word takes on a slightly negative connotation. See also: Pork barrel spending.

2. Money that has been earmarked.
References in periodicals archive ?
Congress, the President, or an agency earmarking to assist with
If this conclusion is warranted, however, academic earmarking is not necessarily as bad as Savage thinks.
In summary, during the 1980s and early 1990s, an era of split control, earmarking was an institutional mechanism to help members attain distributive gains and to become full players in the process.
Any attempt to revive the practice of earmarking will be detrimental to taxpayers, members of Congress, and to the entire legislative process.
More generally, Savage makes a "live by the sword, die by the sword" point about accepting earmarks when he notes that unlike peer review, earmarking has neither an institutionalized structure nor a routine process.
Opponents of earmarking are hampered by the fact that there is no common understanding of just what an "earmark" is.
But Wilson said that without earmarking the money for specific purposes, state officials would have no guarantee that local districts wouldn't simply spend the money on salary increases for employees.
Lest anyone worry that earmark foe Flake will soften his stance against government waste now that the House has imposed a ban on congressional earmarking, never fear; in the weeks to come, Rep.
In every one of these cases, the fungibility of money - its ability to be redirected in any direction - results in earmarked funds being diverted to whatever uses their recipients desire, undermining most if not all of the purpose in earmarking the funds in the first place.
Some Republicans are buying into the argument that the Constitution sanctions earmarking and that "faceless agency bureaucrats" have too much power over how federal tax dollars are allocated.
Flake, a longtime foe of earmarking, is inviting the public to weigh in and choose their favorite bad pun related to one of the top ten nominees.