Eagle

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Eagle

A gold coin minted in the United States between 1795 and 1933. It was worth $10.
References in periodicals archive ?
Eagles prefer to build nests along coastlines, Watts says, often in the same places where people want to live too.
DDT poisoning, plume hunting and sprawl had conspired against the majestic raptor, despite safeguards under the Bald Eagle Protection Act of 1940.
park ranger Tom Dore said of the eagles, who are best identified by the blue tracking tag attached to one of their wings.
Further inland, Tom Miller, ranger for Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, says bald eagles are the prime attraction for the refuge's visitors.
The eagle, nearly four feet tall, perches on his leather-gloved arm.
But until the eagles are out there and we see what they choose to feed on, it's hard to say,'' Faulkner said, noting that the food source on Santa Cruz is more diverse than Catalina.
I've always liked eagles,'' said Dahl, a longtime Pasadena resident who recently moved to Victorville.
The conservation group has appeared with non-releasable eagles and other birds of prey on national TV shows including Good Morning America, Larry King Live, David Letterman, Fox & Friends, Dateline NBC, Jeff Corwin Experience, Jack Hanna's Animal Adventures and Animal Planet.
Celebrating a three-decade struggle to protect the bald eagle from pesticides and encroachments on its habitat, Clinton announced a process that is expected to remove the majestic bird from the list by July 2000.
Mesta said with development, the loss of steelhead runs and the World War II-era introduction of the toxic insecticide DDT, Southern California lost its eagles by the 1950s.
Most often, Indians get permits to obtain feathers and body parts from a federal repository set up to take in carcasses of eagles electrocuted by power lines, hit by automobiles or killed illegally.
Capitol to celebrate the remarkable comeback of the bald eagle and the Endangered Species Act.