due care


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Due Diligence

The investigation of an asset, investment, or anything else to ensure that everything is as it seems. Due diligence helps a buyer or investor make sure that there are no unexpected problems with the asset or investment and that he/she does not overpay. Due diligence can be a complex and formalized process in the acquisition of a company. Even when buying a house, for example, due diligence involves time consuming and at times expensive endeavors, like a home inspection. However, due diligence is seen as a necessary part of doing business or buying an asset. See also: 10-K, Due diligence meeting.

due care

A legal concept meaning just, proper, and sufficient care under the circumstances. It is the care that would be taken by a reasonable person.For example,tenants are required to take due care of leased property and not use a barbecue grill in the living room.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, the code recognizes due care as a process, incorporating these characteristics, that members of the AICPA must follow when performing professional engagements.
In October last year Watts escaped a driving ban after pleading guilty to driving without due care and attention at Barking Magistrates' Court.
On considering complaints against Antony Baker, the disciplinary committee made the following findings: in relation to one client he had failed to prepare accurate year-end accounts and failed to submit them to Companies House timeously, thereby failing to act with professional competence and due care.
But by that time he was unable to prepare mentally for any trial, having become a shaken shell of a man--surely punishment enough for not traveling without due care and attention
1) Under the negligence rule, the injurer avoids liability by taking due care (i.
Constructive notice occurs when a defective condition would have come to the property owner's attention if the property owner had exercised due care.
Essentially, boards had to exercise due care, act in good faith and in a disinterested manner, and not abuse their discretionary position.
Essentially, boards considering change of control transactions are required to exercise due care, act in good faith and in a disinterested manner and not abuse their discretionary position.
This "business-judgment rule" consists of three parts: (1) the officers and directors making the decision are "disinterested," (2) they use due care in making the decision, doing their homework to become familiar with the facts, consulting with experts, if necessary, and making a decision only after assessing the facts, and (3) the decision is made with a reasonable belief that it is in the best interests of the organization and the shareholders.
But the court said that when police take control of a situation, forcing a parent to depend on them to protect a child, they must act with due care for the child's safety.
For instance, in situations where little evidence about a defendant's actions exists after an accident, it may be less costly for the defendant to prove that he took due care than it is for the plaintiff to attempt to prove that the defendant did not take due care.
1989), the Supreme Court of Florida adopted a corporate standard for hospitals that requires hospitals to exercise due care in the selection and retention of physicians.