Downturn

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Related to downturns: Market Downturns

Downturn

(1) A period of contraction or decline of economic activity, especially real GDP, but typically employment as well. (2) The transition of an economy from growth to contraction, also known as a peak of economic activity.

Downturn

A decline in a security or market, especially after a long bullish period. A downturn is considered an inevitable part of the business cycle. See also: Bear market.

downturn

A decline in security prices or economic activity following a period of rising or stable prices or activity. Even strong bull markets are subject to occasional downturns.
References in periodicals archive ?
This recession is likely to be comparable in length and depth with the previous three major post-war UK downturns.
While some doomsday reports have coined the downturn a pseudo Great Depression, Peter Linneman, chief economist at the international real estate network NAI Global, prefers to call today's environment the "Great Capital Strike.
The period was excluded, however, in order to keep the time periods consistent with the downturns in starts and new home sales.
A business that seeks to grow has to realize that access to credit could change significantly during any downturn.
High tax ratios allow for greater automatic stabilisation, but tax cuts implemented during upturns may reduce the scope for counter-cyclical easing in subsequent downturns.
In addition, the AMT is counterproductive: It exacts its heaviest toll during recessions and thus aggravates, rather than ameliorates, the harsh effects of a business downturn.
A combination of relatively low unemployment during the downturn and historically low labor force growth projected for the coming year means that we may quickly see a return to full employment," says Sylvester Schieber, Ph.
If they fall again, then the recession in the United States will be deep and significant, while the UK, now widely expected to avoid recession in the current world downturn, will not escape either.
Increased benefit payments combined with lower tax receipts during downturns can increase the deficit, but typically give the economy enough of a boost to help spur a recovery or at least limit any rise in unemployment.
upfront, a potential economic downturn and the threat of disintermediation.