downsize

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Downsize

To reduce the size of a company. A company downsizes when its operations are perceived to become inefficient and it wishes to concentrate on certain competencies in order to improve profitability and reduce expenses. Downsizing often reduces the number of jobs at the company. Because downsizing reduces expenses, it often increases the company's value and/or dividends for shareholders.

downsize

To reduce the size of a company, often by eliminating one or more divisions. Management may decide to downsize a firm in order to improve efficiency and to increase the returns to shareholders. Downsizing can cause a firm to grow smaller and more valuable at the same time.
References in periodicals archive ?
After controlling for industry, they found that Fortune 100 Companies that downsized did not differ financially from those that did not--one and two years before the layoffs were implemented.
Other laws--such as The Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act of 1988--may require special notification to employees who are being downsized.
Downsized companies often mistakenly measure innovation and its associated risk by measuring inputs, including R&D budgets as well as the number of people employed to find and develop innovations.
A firm that downsized and signaled a willingness to break with long-held implicit c ontracts of permanent employment was perceived to be a "bad company" (in the words of a government official that we interviewed) that had neglected its social responsibilities.
Downsized managers have had a relatively easier time getting rehired than other workers.
Thus, importing may become an even more important function than before the firm downsized.
The average percentage of firms by industry that downsized more than 5 percent of their work-forces across the 15-year period of the study was: manufacturing (25%), retail (17%), and service (15%).
Second, it hopes to advance the field of downsizing and upper echelons theory by investigating the effects of top management team changes on performance in downsized companies.
In the hospitals that downsized, five VPs reported that they had closed three units, one VP had closed five units, and two had closed one unit.
However, our experience has been that most standard machines, even with a downsized barrel, are ultimately more limited by injection speed than by pressure.
This study investigates the real impacts of IS downsizing on the IS department as perceived by IS managers of those companies whose IS had been downsized.