decline

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Decline

A situation in which a stock or other security that has dropped in price over a given period. For example, if a stock opens at $5 and closes at $4.45, it is said to have declined for that trading day.

decline

A decrease in the price of a security.
References in periodicals archive ?
The downturn in this down economy was a real downer.
5%, and mortgages that feature no down payments, no closing costs, and no application fees.
When it was approved at General Synod in 2004 and as recently as its Autumn 2006 newsletter, Letting Down the Nets was described as self-funding, supported by funding from dioceses and other organizations.
Bill authors have to consider whether the bill is worth keeping at all if its main provision is struck down.
If you need one more first down and get it, your ball-carrier should immediately take a knee (not go out of bounds) after making the line to gain.
Filmmaker La Region centrale Goin' down the Road The Hart of London Mon oncle Antoine Warrendale Jesus de Montreal Atanarjuat Les Ordres Reason over Passion Les Flours sauvages
Upside down question mark]Por que decidio dedicarse a la mercadotecnia en deportes?
More specifically, the ALJ stated that the taxpayer had not offered any evidence of why the note was pushed down after being carried on the parent's book for four years, no payment had been made and no interest had been paid or accrued on the debt through the audit period, and no evidence had been adduced demonstrating what the taxpayer had received to trigger its issuance of the note.
McAnally and Downs wrote in 1973, "the director's office now operates in a condition of constant change, intense pressures, and great complexity.
Viacom, Class B, down 7/8 to 38-1/2 on 776,600 shares.
But the near-total dependence on cars to get around just about any urban area outside New York that Downs decries is both irreversible and irrelevant to the urban policy debate.