Doublethink


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Doublethink

A political term referring to the act of willingly believing two contradictory statements. For example, doublethink may involve trusting the government when one's preferred party is in power and never trusting it when the preferred party is not in power. The term is strongly associated with government propaganda. See also: Doublespeak.
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As such, the term has been widely ridiculed as a classic example of Orwellian doublethink. The Wikipedia report of the incident even claims that sales of Nineteen Eighty-Four rose by 9,500 per cent in the aftermath (although, ironically, this statistic may well be a classic example of the phrase in ques- tion).
The 1949 book, which returned to the US best-seller list in January, features a 'Big Brother' government that spies on its citizens and forces them into "doublethink," or simultaneously accepting contradictory versions of the truth.
Here, I believe an example of Orwellian "doublethink" is revealed; we claim to want to serve the best interests of all children while simultaneously encouraging market-based reforms which are necessarily predicated on inequity.
The 2009 law was enacted by the North's Supreme People's Assembly, which is a bit of Orwellian doublethink, considering the government is supreme and the people are denied the egalitarian power, sharing that is at the heart of communism's perpetually-broken promise.
George Orwell called it "doublethink," and it has always been at the heart of nuclear strategy--so much so that even someone as dedicated to the eradication of nuclear war as Perry seems not to notice the contradiction when he goes on record in support of weapons that will (as supporters and opponents agree) expand a future president's "nuclear options."
You may remember my piece on Orwell's dark dystopian novel "1984" and his concept of doublethink, which is the act of people simultaneously accepting two mutually contradictory beliefs as correct.
Orwell's book was highly influential on the English language, introducing concepts like Big Brother, doublethink, Newspeak, and the Thought Police, among many others.
Even though most people will concede in common sense terms that nothing can grow forever in a finite world, this piece of homespun wisdom exists side by side with our pursuit of material things, a kind of doublethink. Driven by the profit motive, our economic system pursues ever-expanding material goals as if there were no limits.
George Orwell's doublethink scarcely begins to describe his assertions.
The novel, which gave the English language expressions such as 'Big Brother' 'doublethink' and 'newspeak', has now inspired the single malt, Jura 1984 Vintage, which has been quietly maturing for the past 30 years.
"To pat someone on the back for looking younger than they are is one of the weirdest examples of doublethink in our culture" TV classics expert Mary Beard, saying people should be proud to grow old.