Double

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Double

The purchase of a call and a put on the same underlying asset with the same strike price and the same expiration date. A double enables one to profit from whatever price movement the underlying takes. That is, if the price goes up, the holder exercises the call, and if it goes down, he/she exercises the put. If one of the options is in the money, the other must be out of the money.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Both distributions were significantly leptokurtotic, but the double-cross distribution was more peaked.
However, Nazi Commander Teichman (Eric Madsen) and his troops are waiting for the Brits and it becomes clear that they have been double-crossed. With no obvious escape route, Jones joins forces with rebel leader Steiner (Aksel Hennie) and hatches a plan to race for the border.
Desperate gamblers, estranged children, knee-cracking thugs and duplicitous women tangle and untangle in a series of telegraphed double-crosses, and the film's subpar script and awkward acting aren't likely to attract attention to this limited release.
This is, of course, a bad idea: in a shocking betrayal that shocks no one but Lion-O, the Thundercats are double-crossed and tossed into the Dogs' Dungeons.
McInerny--has more double-crosses than an Orthodox cathedral.
George Clooney returns for a third outing as Danny Ocean, who rounds up the gang to get revenge on a casino owner who double-crossed one of their friends.
Parker 15, 118 mins Adapted from Flashfire by Donald E Westlake, Parker is an action thriller about a professional thief who is double-crossed by a new crew and swears revenge.
The price of freedom proves high when his wife begins an affair with the crooked crimelord, and he finds he has been double-crossed. Alec Baldwin and Kim Basinger star.
From there, it spirals into a prism of double-crosses, dirty politics, and police corruption.
Director Franklin Bucayu of the Bureau of Corrections was so scared of the convicted drug lords, he never occupied his quarters at the NBP compound; he, too, allegedly double-crossed the drug lords.