Donor

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Donor

One who gives property or assets to someone else through the vehicle of a trust.

Donor

A person or institution who gives assets to another person or institution, either directly or through a trust. Under most circumstances, donors can deduct the value (or depreciated value) of the assets given from their taxable income. While many donors give out of the goodness of their hearts, many do so in order to avoid taxes, especially when donating through a trust.

donor

One who gives a gift.

References in periodicals archive ?
These forces, when combined with the greater influence of private and corporate donorship on American universities, have contributed to a political climate in which "there is no field more radioactive than that of Middle East studies, and nothing more frowned upon than expressions of support for Palestinian studies" (p.
The Daily Star quoted Ussama Safa, the general director of the Lebanese Centre for Policy Studies, as saying: "I've seen Arab donorship on the rise over the past three and four years.
This is particularly helpful in relation to the rationale of donorship and the timing of the gift being offered.
To better capture both the egoistic and altruistic components of giving, we utilize Mount's (1996) Model of Personal Donorship, which suggests a gift can be explained through five factors: involvement, predominance, means, past behavior, and self-interest.
Despite the so-called "Principles of Good Donorship" developed in Stockholm, and updated in Ottawa in May last year, and the need to focus exclusively on the humanitarian imperative, in reality the concern is about the promotion of NGOs who have now become the surrogates of the governments they faithfully represent.
The International Meeting on Good Humanitarian Donorship, held in Stockholm in June 2003 and attended by major donor governments, the UN humanitarian agencies, the Red Cross movement, NGO networks, and think tanks, resulted in the affirmation of principles that constitute a further affirmation of the premises of integration.
The popular press followed the controversy in England after the Archbishop of Canterbury appointed a commission to examine artificial insemination and ruled that the procedure was acceptable when the husband was the donor but not when conception evolved from "extramarital donorship" because it would be a breach of marriage.
The example of Christ's self-emptying shapes his understanding of therapy as a form of 'soul donorship' by the therapist to the client.
And if Linzi's story, and that of her friend Vicky Pettersen, show us anything it is the real value of organ donorship.
After a young student is killed in a cycling accident, the issue of organ donorship is raised.
Mrs Chapman, aged 35, of Co Londonderry, Northern Ireland, added: "I would like to stress the need for more donorship. Everybody should think hard about carrying donor cards.
As chief medical examiner in Washington, D.C., back in 1996, Carter, who generally supports and encourages organ donorship, caused a stir when she informed government officials that she and her staff would not comply with a law empowering them to harvest people's corneas and heart valves without family consent.